Young people design pioneering safeguarding service in Sefton

A young woman from Southport was recently rewarded for her role in giving a makeover to a pioneering new service for young people in Sefton.

Winning a competition to design the logo and branding for Sefton Council’s Community Adolescent Service (CAS), Emma Currie, who is 14 years old, beat stiff competition with her logo design, which focused on togetherness, community cohesion and young people – three key aspects of the project and design brief. Not only was Emma awarded prize vouchers, she was also invited to spend an afternoon with Nonconform, a design agency in Liverpool’s creative and cultural quarter, to work on her designs and bring the identity of the service to life.

Created by Sefton Council with the help of innovation funding from the Department of Education and Central Government, the CAS is a new way of working to support young people age 12-25 to deal with issues that may lead them to crime or entering the care of the Local Authority.

Under the banner of ‘One Family, One Worker, One Plan’, the Community Adolescent Service (CAS) works with young people and their families to help them deal with risk in their lives, including child sexual exploitation, alcohol and drug abuse in their family or with friends, truancy, running away from home and peer pressure to take part in gang related crime.

Aiming to have one worker and one plan for young people referred to the service (young people can also self-refer), the CAS team only works with young people want them to and is made up of social workers, youth offending support workers, Police, mental health, substance misuse and family support services.

Backing for the service from Central Government, was secured following a successful bid from Sefton Council to obtain funding for projects that work creatively with young people to reduce the need for care and youth detention. CAS is one of only two projects to have won this support in the North West.

John-Joseph Kelly, a local councillor and Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Children, Schools and Safeguarding, is a keen supporter of the new service,

“It was a pleasure to be part of the judging panel for the CAS logo competition and hand the winning certificate and prize to Emma, who was a worthy winner.

I am very much aware that the competition was a fun element to what is a service with a very serious purpose: to ensure young people at risk of sexual exploitation, substance misuse and criminal activity are reached before those risks increase or they come under the care of Sefton Council.
It is in the interests of Sefton’s young people, the Local Authority and Sefton’s communities that the CAS is successful and leads the way to a new approach to supporting young people.”

Andrew Weatherstone, Director at Nonconform, said:

“The team and I were very impressed with Emma’s ideas and her clear vision for the branding of the service, which made working on the project both a fun and smooth process. We are proud to have won the opportunity to be involved in such an interesting and innovative service.”

You can learn more about the Community Adolescent Service by visiting www.sefton.gov.uk/cas or by using #speaktoCAS on Facebook and Twitter.