Sefton CCGs hailed finalists for prestigious HSJ award

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) were named a finalist at the prestigious Health Service Journal (HSJ) Award held at the InterContinental O2 in London on 23 November.

Their apprenticeship scheme with Hugh Baird College was shortlisted under the workforce category with ten other entrants across the UK.

The bespoke course designed and shaped by the CCGs with Hugh Baird College gave apprentices the chance to train whilst working in a GP practice to get the hands on experience that they need. Many of them still work in practice and some have gone on to complete further training.

Debbie Fagan, chief nurse at the CCGs said: “We were absolutely delighted to be shortlisted for the award, the team here worked so hard to design the course with Hugh Baird and all of the apprentices who took part have expressed how beneficial it was to them.

“In this climate where it isn’t that easy to source funding for further qualifications or to get jobs easily, they relished the opportunity and gave it their all. We are just happy that they found it so worthwhile. A big well done goes to all of the winners on the night, especially to London Ambulance Service NHS Trust in the workforce category.”

Alastair McLellan, Editor, HSJ, said: “With the NHS experiencing a tough time as funding fails to keep up with demand, the HSJ Awards were once again the best reminder of the excellence the service is capable of. Taken together the entries to the HSJ Awards represent work which, directly or indirectly, has saved thousands of lives and enhanced many times that number.”

Now in their 35th year, the most sought after accolade in British healthcare recognises, celebrates and promotes the finest achievements in NHS, and showcases them to the service’s most influential leaders.

To view a short video about the CCGs’ apprenticeship scheme please visit please visit: www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5HPrUU1rNk

For the full winner list please visit:

www.hsj.co.uk/newsletter/topics/quality-and-performance/hsj-awards-2016-winners-revealed/7013566.article?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter308

Still Time For The Flu Jab

Residents across Sefton are still being urged to get the flu jab this winter by Sefton Council and local health commissioners.

The flu vaccination is one of the most effective ways to reduce harm from flu as it
reduces risk of serious illness, hospitalisation and even death among those who are most at risk.

Free flu vaccinations are being offered to all pregnant women, all children aged 2 to 4, residents of all ages with a long term health condition and everyone aged 65 and over. Most people who are eligible can get vaccinated at their local GP practice.

In addition, this year children in school years one, two and three have been offered the flu vaccination and a programme has been carried out across the borough offering the nasal spray.

The flu vaccine for children is given as a single dose of nasal spray squirted up each nostril. Not only is it needle-free (a big advantage for children), the nasal spray works even better than the injected flu vaccine.

It’s quick and painless and means children are less likely to become ill if they come into contact with the flu virus.

Cllr Ian Moncur, Cabinet Member Health and Wellbeing, said: “There is still time for residents to get the flu jab or the nasal spray flu vaccine.

“Flu is a highly contagious illness that spreads rapidly and can be very unpleasant for children and adults alike. Symptoms include fever, chills, aching muscles, headache, stuffy nose, dry cough and sore throat lasting up to a week.

“By having the vaccination it will go a long way to protect yourself against such nasty symptoms.”

Pippa Rose, a practice nurse lead for NHS South Sefton clinical commissioning group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “As well as planning your Christmas shopping, remember to book your flu jab before the colder weather sets in.

“Having a flu jab isn’t just about protecting you from what can be serious effects of the flu but also helps reduce the spread of flu to those around you. We also encourage carers to get protected too.

“It’s really good news that a greater number of children can now benefit from the free vaccine. However, we mustn’t forget that it’s equally important for expectant mums, those aged over 65, or anyone of any age who has diabetes, chest complaints like bronchitis and kidney problems to get their vaccination.

“If you are not sure if you qualify for a free vaccine, just contact your practice and they’ll be happy to offer advice.”

For more information on the flu vaccine for children please visit: www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/pages/child-flu-vaccine.aspx

And for a full list of who is eligible for a flu vaccine please visit: www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vaccinations/Pages/who-should-have-flu-vaccine.aspx

Hear more about your local NHS

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Sefton have announced the dates of their next governing body meetings and are encouraging anyone with an interest to go along.

The CCGs’ hold their bi-monthly governing body meetings in public, so people can hear them discussing and making decisions about local health services.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals who make up the committees will discuss a range of issues including the performance of the services they commission, like hospitals and community care.

Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “The governing body is a formal meeting and it’s a way for people to find out more about what we’re doing. They can also ask us any questions ahead of the meeting getting underway.”

Andy Mimnagh, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG chair, said: “The meetings are also a chance for residents to meet some of the doctors and other professionals that make up the governing body and to listen in on the discussions taking place.”

The NHS South Sefton CCG meeting will take place on Thursday 24 November at Merton House, Stanley Road in Bootle at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

The NHS Southport and Formby CCG meeting will take place on Wednesday 30 November at the Family Life Centre, Ash St, Southport, Merseyside, PR8 6JH, at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

Anyone who is interested in attending is asked to call 0151 247 7000 to confirm their attendance.

Help yourself to stay healthy this winter

Health leaders at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are encouraging people this self-care week (14-20 November) to be aware of how they can look after themselves this winter and to examine their options should they become ill.

By keeping fit and healthy, individuals can take control of their own health, manage minor illnesses and effectively manage long term conditions.

If you do need further help, think carefully and examine your options available across Sefton. For example, think about using NHS 111 for advice as they can direct you to the appropriate service. Go to your local chemist for advice if you need it, they can offer assistance on minor ailments and common illnesses.

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “It’s important that people know when and how they can treat themselves and when they should seek further advice. By taking simple steps to look after yourself this winter, you can have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing.

“When it comes to treating minor ailments and illnesses, it’s important to examine your options. You can get plenty of advice from your local chemist as well as on the NHS Choices website. Remember, the accident and emergency departments and ambulance services are for life-threatening conditions. By selecting the right option, you can help the NHS to direct their focus to the patients who need it the most.”

The week compliments the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, encouraging people to look after themselves during the winter months – reminding them to see a pharmacist if they need advice on managing cough or cold symptoms; and for older people, a reminder to keep warm during the winter months by putting on an extra layer or turning up their heat.

More information on how everyone can use self-care to improve their health and wellbeing is available on the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk. And for more information on the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, visit: www.nhs.uk/staywell

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care. There are a variety of services that can support you to do this:

Pharmacy Services

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can help you prepare for many of the common illnesses like coughs and colds.

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies and dentists in your local area by visiting the NHS.uk website: http://www.nhs.uk. It also includes a symptom checker.

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: http://www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

Patients can also manage their health needs at home using Patient Access which is available on desktop or as a free app where you can arrange appointments, order repeat medications and update your personal details.*

For more information on Patient Access visit: https://patient.emisaccess.co.uk/account/login or watch this video for more information: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRM5YzabvVc

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

For more information please visit www.examineyouroptions.info

*please note that some practices may use a slightly different system to patient access so it is worth asking your GP practice for more information

Hospital told to make further improvements to A&E by watchdog

SOUTHPORT and Ormskirk Hospital requires considerable improvements to make both sites safer, more effective, responsive and an improvement in leadership – according to a care watchdog report.

Inspectors from the Care and Qualities Commission visited the Trust in April of this year to see how much improvement had been made since its previous report in May 2015.

Some postives could be taken from the report, which was released on Tuesday (November 15), as the North West Regional Spinal Injuries Unit at Southport hospital improved two levels from Inadequate to Good with some aspects of outstanding practice.

Inspectors also noted improvements the maternity service had made at Ormskirk hospital, rating it Requires Improvement. It was previously rated Inadequate.

Yet overall improvements still need to be made to raise the hospital’s rating further. Perhaps most damningly the CQC has rated  the accident and emergency department and the surgical services at Southport and Formby District General Hospital as Inadequate.

Inspectors found that the hospital did not give sufficient priority to safety in urgent care.

Patients needing urgent care were waiting too long to be seen and assessed, with some patients remaining in the department under the supervision of ambulance staff for periods of up to 11 hours.

In surgery at Southport and Formby District General Hospital, staff did not always assess, monitor or manage risks to people who use the services and opportunities to prevent or minimise harm were missed.

Medically deteriorating patients were not always identified promptly and there could be a delay before medical assessment was undertaken.

The recruitment of suitable medical staff was challenging with vacancies for junior doctors and consultants.

Recruitment and retention of nursing and midwifery had been a longstanding issue.

However, the inspectors found there had been a notable improvement in both the maternity services and the North West Regional Spinal Injuries Centre which had both received Inadequate ratings at the last inspection. The Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Professor Sir Mike Richards, said: “Two years ago we identified a number of problems at Southport and Ormskirk NHS Trust.

“I am disappointed that overall the progress has been limited and that we have found a deterioration in the safety and quality of some of the trust’s services, particularly in the emergency department at Southport and Formby Hospital.

“I note with concern the delays in patients being assessed in the accident and emergency department, and the risks to safety in surgery which must be addressed.

“Since our inspection earlier this year the trust has taken steps to improve – and we are monitoring that on a monthly basis.

“On the other hand, there have been significant improvements in all aspects of patient care and treatment at the North West Regional Spinal Injuries Unit that we had previously rated as inadequate for safety. It is now rated as Good with some aspects of outstanding practice.

“We have also found improvements within the maternity service although there is room for further progress.

“Until recently, the trust was led by an interim executive team, which limited the ability to demonstrate a clear strategy for the future.

“It is important now that the new executive team focusses on the areas where we have identified continuing shortfalls.”

Rob Gillies, executive medical director, said: “The inspection they said the Trust possessed ‘committed, compassionate, and passionate staff who are willing to go above and beyond to do their best for patients’.

“We are delighted to see this confirmed.”

Responding to the rating of A&E and surgical services at Southport, Mr Gillies said significant progress had been made on the issues the inspectors raised seven months ago.

“A&E is now a very different department. We have benefited from external support and put in resources of our own, including an extra £600,000 for nurses staffing.

“This has contributed to a major improvement with the department regularly the best performer in Cheshire and Merseyside and consistently among the top performers in the country,” he said.

Help yourself to stay healthy this winter

Health leaders at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are encouraging people this self-care week (14-20 November) to be aware of how they can look after themselves this winter and to examine their options should they become ill.

By keeping fit and healthy, individuals can take control of their own health, manage minor illnesses and effectively manage long term conditions.

If you do need further help, think carefully and examine your options available across Sefton. For example, think about using NHS 111 for advice as they can direct you to the appropriate service. Go to your local chemist for advice if you need it, they can offer assistance on minor ailments and common illnesses.

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “It’s important that people know when and how they can treat themselves and when they should seek further advice. By taking simple steps to look after yourself this winter, you can have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing.

“When it comes to treating minor ailments and illnesses, it’s important to examine your options. You can get plenty of advice from your local chemist as well as on the NHS Choices website. Remember, the accident and emergency departments and ambulance services are for life-threatening conditions. By selecting the right option, you can help the NHS to direct their focus to the patients who need it the most.”

The week compliments the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, encouraging people to look after themselves during the winter months – reminding them to see a pharmacist if they need advice on managing cough or cold symptoms; and for older people, a reminder to keep warm during the winter months by putting on an extra layer or turning up their heat.

More information on how everyone can use self-care to improve their health and wellbeing is available on the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk. And for more information on the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, visit: www.nhs.uk/staywell

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care. There are a variety of services that can support you to do this:

Pharmacy Services

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can help you prepare for many of the common illnesses like coughs and colds.

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies and dentists in your local area by visiting the NHS.uk website:  http://www.nhs.uk. It also includes a symptom checker.

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service.  NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: http://www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

Patients can also manage their health needs at home using Patient Access which is available on desktop or as a free app where you can arrange appointments, order repeat medications and update your personal details.*

For more information on Patient Access visit: https://patient.emisaccess.co.uk/account/login or watch this video for more information: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRM5YzabvVc

 

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

For more information please visit www.examineyouroptions.info

*please note that some practices may use a slightly different system to patient access so it is worth asking your GP practice for more information

New home for the Southport Macmillan support centre

Macmillan’s Cancer Information and Support Centre in Southport has moved premises and is celebrating with an event for the public.

Previously on Scarisbrick Avenue, the new centre, now at 20 Stanley Street in Southport, will be holding its Macmillan coffee launch on Thursday 13th October from 10am – 2pm.

The centre, set up by Macmillan and NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), supports people affected by cancer. The launch event will be a fun filled day with coffee and cake, a raffle, mini make-overs from Boots, hand massages from Sefton O.P.E.R.A, singing from the Macmillan singing group and lots more.

Dr Graeme Allan, Macmillan GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG cancer clinical lead, said: “It is important for us to let people know we have moved but also to invite them along to see the new premises. Whether you’ve been to see us before or are interested in the support we can offer to people affected by cancer, we’d really like to see you. It will be an action packed event with some of our groups on hand to showcase their skills and talk to people about joining them if they are interested.”

The centre offers people the chance to get involved in support groups such as crafts, singing and gardening, it also gives emotional and financial support and counselling to those on its cancer recovery programme who might need it.

The group holds a Health and Wellbeing Event three times a year bringing likeminded people together. The next event is on Thursday 3rd November at 1pm at Southport Theatre & Convention Centre.

The Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Centre team are available Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm on 01704 533024 or email sfccg.macmillancic@nhs.net. For more information, please visit: www.southportmacmillancentre.org.uk

Think Local Act Personal (TLAP)’s Care Act 2014 Survey

Care Act Survey – Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) is running a survey that asks how much of a difference the Care Act has made in the experience of people with care and support needs, and carers. There have been many Care Act surveys, but this one will be the first that specifically seeks their views.

The results of the survey will be used to help the Department of Health identify problems and find solutions to inform future work on the Care Act.

Find out more about the TLAP Care Act survey. The closing date is the 4th October.  It should take about 10 minutes to fill in and participants can enter a prize draw to win £100 of shopping vouchers.

CQC Diabetes Review

Review methods
CQC carried out fieldwork for the review between January and March 2016 including East Lancashire, Liverpool and North East Lincolnshire in the North. The review looked at 4 key aspects of care for people with diabetes, including:
•        Identification and diagnosis
•        Structured education and support for self-management
•        Care pathway
•        Person-centred care coordination

The review included interviews with GPs, clinicians and commissioners; multi-professional / multi agency focus groups with staff; focus groups, 1 to 1 interviews, and case tracking of people with diabetes. The review looked at existing evidence from CQC’s comprehensive inspections, information provided by Healthwatch, CCGs and other data sources. The review also used an online web form, limited to the areas covered by the fieldwork, to gather the experiences, opinions and insights of people about their diabetes care.

Review conclusions

The review discovered that people at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes were not always identified and supported to become healthier. Some people felt they were not receiving enough emotional support – providing this support at diagnosis and beyond can contribute to more effective self-management and increase engagement with services and attendance at structured education programmes.

 

CQC saw many examples that others can learn from, including local commissioners and providers proactively engaging with individuals and communities, and innovative methods to increase people’s ability to self-manage. The review also highlighted that people who had attended structured education courses felt it improved their ability and confidence to manage their diabetes. Where these courses were less likely to be accessed, for example by people from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups, some local services were able to show how they were providing culturally relevant information, support and training to people in their local community.

Healthwatch Sefton publish Annual Report 2015/2016:

Healthwatch Sefton have published their 2015/16 Annual Report.

The report details the impact and activities over the past year to place patients and the public at the heart of health and social care service improvement. It includes case studies, updates and information about our journey and achievements.

Click here to download a copy of the Annual Report.

Sefton CCGs: “Our repeat prescription ordering pilot explained”

Are you a patient at one of the 19 GP practices taking part in the Sefton CCG’s repeat prescription ordering pilot? If so, take a look at the film below that tells you more about how the pilot works.

You can also find answers to some frequently asked questions that people have been asking us on this dedicated webpage, along with links to more short films that you may find helpful.

There is also a short survey on the webpage that the CCG’s are asking patients from the 19 practices involved to complete with their feedback.

Pilot to improve medicines safety and reduce waste

A new pilot in 19 Sefton GP practices is beginning on 1st September, which will improve the safety of repeat prescriptions and reduce wasted medicines, estimated at costing the local NHS at least £2 million each year.

NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS South Sefton CCG are piloting the new system that stops pharmacies from being able to order repeat prescriptions on behalf of patients from those participating practices.

Susanne Lynch, head of medicines management for both CCGs, said: “It is important to note that the pilot will not affect anyone who already orders their own repeat prescriptions directly from their GP practice, and whilst the new system may be inconvenient for some, it does address some very real medicines safety issues as well as safeguarding precious NHS funds.”   

Whilst GP practices will put special arrangements in place for those patients who are not able to order their own repeat prescriptions directly from their GP practice, the new system is expected to affect just over 47,000 of a total of nearly 280,000 people registered at practices in Sefton.

It means that from 1 September, GP practices will be able to more safely monitor repeat prescriptions for these patients, ensuring their repeat medications remain appropriate for their individual medical conditions, which often change over time.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG and Southport GP, said: “We know that the current system often leads to patients receiving medications they do not require, yet because their pharmacy orders their repeats for them people continue to receive excess, which is a real safety issue and we need to end this.” 

So, as well as introducing safer prescribing systems, the scheme will also save money, enabling more vital NHS funds to be spent on priority healthcare benefiting a greater number of Sefton residents.

Councillor Catie Page, chair of Sefton Council’s Overview and Scrutiny Committee for Adult Social Care and Health, said: “We know our NHS services are operating in difficult financial times, so anything that can save resources whilst importantly improving patient safety at the same time has to be welcomed and I’d encourage residents who may experience some initial inconvenience to consider the overwhelming safety and cost benefits of this pilot.”

Bootle GP, Dr Anna Ferguson, added: “This is about patients, carers, practices and pharmacies working together to achieve the safest and most cost effective prescribing systems that benefit us all.” 

Cllr Page concluded: “If you are experiencing any difficulties don’t be afraid to speak to your practice or the Patient Advice and Liaison Service to resolve any issues.” 

The pilot will initially run for six months in the 19 participating practices and patients will be invited to give their views and experiences as part of the evaluation of the system.

Anyone wanting to give their views about the pilot can complete a short survey, which can be found on each CCG’s website, along with more information about the project by following the links below.

NHS Southport and Formby CCG website – http://www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/current-exercises/pilot-scheme-for-ordering-repeat-medicines/

NHS South Sefton CCG website – http://www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/current-exercises/pilot-scheme-for-ordering-repeat-medicines/     

Those patients affected by the scheme have been sent a letter from their practice and the two CCGs, giving them full details of how the pilot will work and what it means for them. Anyone who has queries or who wants to know more can contact the PALS team on 0800 218 2333 or email CMCSU.PALS@nhs.net 

Southport Macmillan Cancer Recovery Programme recognised in top awards

A cancer recovery package put together by Macmillan’s Cancer Information and Support Centre in Southport with its partners, has been nominated in the prestigious Macmillan Professionals Excellence Awards.

The package for those affected by cancer in Southport, jointly designed by Macmillan, NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), Southport & Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust and Sefton Council has been shortlisted in the integration excellence category.

Aiming to help local residents move on with life after hospital treatment, the integrated package brings together a wide range of ongoing activities to support those affected by cancer to improve their physical health and mental wellbeing.

Research is showing that being physically active during and after cancer treatment helps to provide a variety of health and well-being benefits including helping to manage fatigue.

The ‘Move More’ part of the programme, run by Lucy Holmes at Active Lifestyles, Sefton Council, offers its own physical and wellness activities such as a gentle circuit class and relaxation session, a low impact chair class, gym sessions, swimming and a gardening group. As well as support in helping cancer patients in becoming more aware, the Move More activities allow people to participate in targeted physical activity sessions that are readily available locally within the community

The centre also offers the chance to get involved in community groups such as crafts and singing, it also gives emotional and financial support and also counselling to those on the programme who might need it. Along with this and a host of other activity, the group holds a health and wellbeing event three times a year bringing likeminded people together and a seven week course to help people overcome problems they face.

Dr Graeme Allan, Macmillan GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG cancer clinical lead, said: “We have worked hard on this package to get it right and it’s a real team effort, bringing together a host of activities, advice and information to benefit people living with and beyond cancer and it’s great that we’re being recognised for that.

“We’re so pleased that people in Southport and Formby are benefiting from the programme, the main thing for us is that people in the area know there is help and support available to them. Sometimes just talking to others at our health and wellbeing event really helps people to realise they are not alone in what they are going through.”

Jackie Brunton, Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust’s lead cancer nurse, said: “I am so pleased that the programme has been shortlisted for the award, it works because we have such a strong and special integrated partnership with Macmillan and the CCG in Southport and Formby.

“The programme is about professionals coming together with the patient at the centre of it all. This will be a real celebration for all teams involved.”

The awards ceremony will take place on Thursday 17 November at the Hilton Metropole in Birmingham.

Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Centre is a joint partnership set up by Macmillan and NHS Southport and Formby CCG, it is based on Scarisbrick Avenue in Southport. The team is on hand to offer help and support to anyone affected by cancer Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm. For more information, please visit: www.southportmacmillancentre.org.uk

For more information on the awards please see: http://www.macmillan.org.uk/aboutus/healthandsocialcareprofessionals/networking/macmillanprofessionalsawards/macmillanprofessionalsawards.aspx

NHS and the council offer tips to stay cool in the heatwave

Following the level two heatwave warning from the Met Office health experts and the council are offering tips on how to keep cool and are reminding parents to keep children protected from the sun ahead of the school holidays.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Sefton Council are reminding those with breathing conditions in particular to stay cool and avoid the sun at the hottest part of the day if they can.

The Met Office has issued the heatwave alert, with a 40% risk for the North West and say the highest temperatures are expected Tuesday afternoon. There is an 80% probability of heatwave conditions between 12:00 Monday and 18:00 Thursday in parts of England.

For people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the sun can cause their bodies to go into overdrive as it tries to stay cool. They can become dehydrated and overheat causing the body to perspire, making them feel more breathless than usual. It is advised that they plan their day around the heat if they can so perhaps avoid going outside during the hottest point which are normally between 11:00 and 15:00.

Also, with the school holidays approaching, parents are being reminded to make sure children have plenty of sun protection. It is important to keep them topped up with sunscreen and put hats on them in the heatwave to protect them from the hot weather.

Nigel Taylor, clinical lead at NHS South Sefton CCG said: “It is important for people to avoid the sun where they can and to drink lots of water to keep hydrated. Keeping your house cool will help with the use of fans and also keeping the curtains closed is a good idea.

“It is important to eat as normal, often the heat makes you lose your appetite but it is important to keep to your normal diet to replace the natural salt in food that you lose through perspiring. If you do become ill during the heatwave we are reminding people to examine their options, there is lots of help out there at your pharmacy and on the NHS 111 number to consider before thinking about going to A&E. Hospitals do become a lot busier when a heatwave hits so it could save you a lot of time.”

Cllr Ian Moncur, Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing at Sefton Council, said: “Like the CCG we are reminding Sefton residents to be careful during the heatwave. We are reminding people to dress wisely for the weather, lightweight, loose fitting clothes are best and wearing suitable headwear and a good pair of sunglasses will really help.

“Take cool showers if you get too hot and where possible avoid heavy activity and slow down when walking around. Before planning a day out in the holidays it would be good to check what the weather is doing as you may need to change your plans slightly or make yourself a bit more prepared.”

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care such as ‘care at the chemist’. More information on examining your options can be found here: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/your-health-and-services

For more information on the weather in your area please visit: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/forecast/#?tab=map

Paddlers and Swimmers Urged to Stay Safe During Warm Weather

Merseyside Police is reminding people of the importance of staying safe around open water during the fine weather.

Two young children had to be rescued by an adult at Crosby Marina in Sefton earlier this afternoon after getting into difficulty while paddling.

The boy and the girl were taken to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital as a precaution. They will be kept in overnight for observations.

The circumstances of how they came to be in trouble in the water is being investigated by the police.

Chief Superintendent Claire Richards from the Sefton command team, said: “More than 400 people drown each year and around 60 per cent of victims are children. Yet many of these tragedies could have been prevented if some simple precautions had been taken.

“The Royal Life Saving Society UK offers some really important advice to people looking to enjoy a swim or a paddle at one of Merseyside’s many beaches, lakes or pools this summer.

“It is really simple stuff like keeping an eye on your children at all times and closely supervising them when they are playing near or in water, educating yourself about the local safety advice before you go for a swim or a paddle, and only do so in designated areas.

“It is possible to drown in just a few inches of water and we need to respect that fact and be mindful of the precautions we should all take before we can enjoy ourselves.”

For more information visit http://www.rlss.org.uk/water-safety/water-safety/

Better Care in my Hands: Care Quality Commission’s Report into People’s Involvement in their Care

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and social care services in England. We make sure that hospitals, care homes, dental and GP surgeries and other care services in England provide people with safe, effective, compassionate and high-quality care, and we encourage them to make improvements.

CQC is publishing a report into the extent and quality of people’s involvement in their health and social care, based on new analysis of CQC’s national reports and inspection findings and on national patient surveys.

People’s right to being involved in their own care is enshrined in law in the fundamental standards of care. It is an essential part of person-centred care and leads to better and often more cost effective outcomes. This is particularly true for those with long term conditions or people who need to use services more intensively. The NHS Five Year Forward View and the Care Act place renewed focus on improving this area of care and CQC can take enforcement action against providers of care services that fail to meet this standard. This report is timely because as health and social care services reconfigure to adapt to the changing needs of their populations there is an opportunity to make sure person centred care becomes a reality for more people. The report identifies what enables people’s involvement in their own care and provides examples of good practice identified by CQC inspectors. CQC will use the findings from this report to strengthen our regulation and reporting of people’s involvement in their care.

Our key findings are:

Recent national patient survey data shows that just over half of those surveyed report feeling definitely involved in decisions about their health care and treatment, and this includes people’s responses for care in hospitals and in the community.

Women who use maternity services are particularly positive about how well they are involved in decisions about their care.We found examples of good practice of people’s involvement in their care in our inspections over the last year. However, there has been little change in people’s perceptions of how well they are involved in their health or social care over the last five years. A significant minority of people have consistently reported only feeling involved in their care to some extent or not at all over this period.

CQC’s national reports and thematic reviews from the last five years consistently show that some groups of people are less involved in their care than others. This is confirmed by new analysis of patient surveys. They are:

– Adults and young people with long term physical and mental health conditions.
– People with a learning disability.
– People over 75 years old.

We have also reported a lack of progress over the last six years in involving people in their care when they are detained under the Mental Health Act. Poor involvement in care is the biggest issue we found in monitoring the use of the Mental Health Act in 2014/15.

There are common problems in health and social care services, which can create a vicious circle of poor involvement particularly for those using different services or using services over a long period of time. These include:

– Failure to assess and monitor people’s capacity to make decisions about their care and to provide advocacy support
– Limited understanding , recording and monitoring of people’s wishes and preferences
– Inadequate family and carer involvement
– Lack of information and explanation of care and support options

 

MP John Pugh opens new Spinal Day Room at Southport Hospital

John Pugh MP officially opened a refurbished day room for patients at Southport Hospital.

The new room will be used by patients of The North West Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, at Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust.

The centre cares for people with spinal cord injuries from Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Cumbria, Cheshire, parts of North Wales and the Isle of Man.

The day room has now been completely revamped providing a light, bright location for patients to cook meals, chat and relax.

Emily Hoban, who runs the centre, said: “We were delighted Mr Pugh was able to officially open this new facility which will provide a fantastic environment for our patients.”

The centre is internationally recognised for the excellent treatment of people with high cervical spinal cord injury.

Public Health Report: How VCSE organisations contribute to wellbeing, health and care

This report (click here) sets out recommendations for voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) organisations in the health and care sector.

This is a joint review by the Department of Health, Public Health England, and NHS England. The aim of the review is to:

  • describe the role of the VCSE sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes
  • identify the challenges and opportunities in realising the sector’s potential
  • address challenges and maximise opportunities

The report makes recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. It emphasises putting wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSEorganisations an integral part of a collaborative system.

Sefton CCGs to become ‘dementia friendly’

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have signed up to become ‘Dementia Friends’ and are well on their way to reaching their target after gaining some training from the top doctor who is leading this work.

Both CCGs are working towards being ‘dementia friendly’ with 100 reception staff at Sefton GP practices already having received the training. In addition, a group of staff at the CCGs’ offices received training from the National Clinical Director for Dementia at NHS England, Alistair Burns,

He said: “It was fantastic to be here and I was delighted to meet with so many people at the CCG. It was good to hear about the work they are already doing to improve dementia diagnosis rates in Sefton and the post diagnosis support that they are offering to patients.

“I was really impressed with the enthusiasm and energy in the room and thoroughly enjoyed the session which so many people attended. It is good news to hear that the CCG are amongst the few CCGs who have signed up to become dementia friendly. It is so important to raise as much awareness as we can and with their partners I’m sure the message will be spread far and wide.”

The CCGs’ have signed a pledge with Sefton Dementia Action Alliance (DAA), supporting the national movement to bring about a society wide response to dementia. The Sefton DAA is made up of organisations in the borough who aim to work together to radically improve the lives of people living with dementia and their carers. Its official launch in Sefton is in Dementia Awareness Week on Wednesday 18th May.

Part of the CCGs’ action plan in the alliance is to raise awareness about dementia in the community and to encourage member practices and providers to become dementia friends, which they have both started working on.

Fiona Taylor, chief officer at both CCGs, said: “Dementia is a priority area for both CCGs which is why the training was important to us. At the session when staff were asked if anyone in the room knew someone with dementia, of course, over half the room lifted their hands. We were asked to make a pledge and on behalf of the CCG I am keen to spread the word on dementia and whilst we’ve work to do to improve care and the diagnosis rate, I am really pleased that the CCGs are becoming dementia friendly and that we are part of the alliance, which is so important for Sefton.

“Dementia is of interest to everyone, not only on a personal level but on a professional one as well. It’s so important that people understand how someone with dementia may feel in certain situations. Thanks to Alistair for running the session for us, I’m sure we’ll all wear our badges proudly.

“Small changes to the way our society, communities, shops and businesses are run can make a huge difference to people with dementia. By improving awareness and having a greater understanding of dementia we can hopefully make a real difference to those living with dementia and their carers.”

A Dementia Friend learns a little bit more about what it’s like to live with dementia and then turns that understanding into action – anyone of any age can be a Dementia Friend. Whether you attend a face to face Dementia Friends Information Session or watch their online video, Dementia Friends is about learning more about dementia and the small ways you can help. From telling friends about Dementia Friends to visiting someone you know living with dementia, every action counts.

For more information visit: www.dementiafriends.org.uk

Police officers raise cash for cancer care equipment

A group of Merseyside Police officers who set up a charity to raise money for the hospital which cared for a colleague’s daughter have been fundraising again.

The Sefton officers formed ‘Team Phoebe’ to support cystic fibrosis at Ormskirk General Hospital after Martin Duddy’s daughter, Phoebe, was born with the condition four years ago.

But since then, their registered charity ‘Phoebe’s Fund’ has raised money for countless other good causes across Merseyside and last week they presented a cheque for £1,200 to nurses from Liverpool Community Health Trust.

The team raised the money by holding a charity race night at Crosby Comrades Club and it will be used to buy a morphine syringe pump for Macmillan nurses to administer pain relief to cancer patients being cared for at home or in hospices.

The charitable cause was chosen by Kelly Coulton, whose husband Steve, a serving Sefton police officer, died from cancer last year.

Kelly said: “I would like to thank everyone involved in the fundraising for the money to buy the syringe pump. The symptoms of bone cancer can vary greatly but include persistent bone pain that gets worse over time and continues into the night with swelling, redness and a noticeable lump.

“I want to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of bone cancer to young people, who might not think they can get it, because the earlier a cancer is picked up, the easier it is to treat it and treat it successfully. It is important that people go their doctor as soon as possible if they notice worrying symptoms.”

‘Team Phoebe’, as the group of police officers and support staff have called themselves, have previous raised money for the stroke unit at Aintree University Hospital in Fazakerley, a disabled child in Kirkby whose i-pad was stolen in a burglary, and to help the family of another colleague who died suddenly of a heart attack.

Chief Inspector Simon Thompson from Sefton command team, said: “We set the charity up originally to help the hospital that gives such great care to Martin’s little girl Phoebe.

“But when we got talking we realised that there were so many good causes that between us we had been touched by in some way. So we widened it out and started raising money in Phoebe’s name for anyone who needed it.

“The stroke unit at Fazakerley is one that is close to my heart and Steve Coulton was a very dear friend and colleague to many of us. When Kelly asked the team to raise money for a morphine syringe to help relieve the pain for terminally ill cancer patients we were only too happy to help.

“Word has spread about what we do and we’ve had great support from throughout the force and the other services we work with in terms of people coming along to fundraising events. It has really shown the community spirit within this police force and the NHS.”

Sefton area commander, Chief Superintendent Claire Richards, added: “It is testament to this group of Sefton officers that as well as doing busy, difficult jobs they still make time to raise money for people less fortunate than them.

“The charity events they have organised over the years have been very well supported by colleagues within Merseyside Police and I am looking forward to supporting the next good cause Phoebe’s fund chooses.”

Syringe drivers are small, battery-operated portable pumps which deliver a steady flow of injected medication under the skin in a steady, reliable way to control pain.

Claire Johnston, community Macmillan nurse and Kirsten Collins, the district nurse who helped care for Steve towards the end of his life accepted the cheque from Phoebe’s Fund on behalf of Liverpool Community Health NHS Trust.

They said: “We are so grateful to Team Phoebe for raising this money. The syringe driver is a vital piece of equipment that will help improve the quality of life for our patients nearing the end of life.”

Police Constable Martin Duddy, who continues to raise money while he and his wife care for 4-year-old Phoebe, added: “Since day one when Phoebe was born Ormskirk hospital have been second to none in their support and care.

“Without their help and that of my colleagues and bosses within the police I don’t think I would have been able to cope.

“Phoebe is on lots of medication every single day and my wife has had to give up her own job as a nurse to care for her. But we can’t wrap her up in cotton wool and she’s got to be allowed to be a normal little girl. She certainly rules the roost in our house and it is humbling that so much fundraising by people willing to go above and beyond is being done in her name.”

Sefton area commander, Chief Superintendent Claire Richards, added: “It is testament to this group of Sefton officers that as well as doing busy, difficult jobs they still make time to raise money for people less fortunate than them.

“The charity events they have organised over the years have been very well supported by colleagues within Merseyside Police and I am looking forward to supporting the next good cause Phoebe’s fund chooses.”

Syringe drivers are small, battery-operated portable pumps which deliver a steady flow of injected medication under the skin in a steady, reliable way to control pain.

Claire Johnston, community Macmillan nurse and Kirsten Collins, the district nurse who helped care for Steve towards the end of his life accepted the cheque from Phoebe’s Fund on behalf of Liverpool Community Health NHS Trust.

They said: “We are so grateful to Team Phoebe for raising this money. The syringe driver is a vital piece of equipment that will help improve the quality of life for our patients nearing the end of life.”

Police Constable Martin Duddy, who continues to raise money while he and his wife care for 4-year-old Phoebe, added: “Since day one when Phoebe was born Ormskirk hospital have been second to none in their support and care.

“Without their help and that of my colleagues and bosses within the police I don’t think I would have been able to cope.

“Phoebe is on lots of medication every single day and my wife has had to give up her own job as a nurse to care for her. But we can’t wrap her up in cotton wool and she’s got to be allowed to be a normal little girl. She certainly rules the roost in our house and it is humbling that so much fundraising by people willing to go above and beyond is being done in her name.”

South Sefton CCG Scheme to Improve Support in Care Homes

A programme, launched by NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), is the first of its kind in the North West to offer care homes a comprehensive package of support to look after their residents.

The Care Home Innovation Programme (CHIP) brings together several initiatives to improve the quality of care homes such as community matron visits, standardisation of protocols, a bi-monthly quality improvement collaborative meeting and training for care home staff.

Due to its success the programme has recently been highlighted in the newly published end of life thematic review by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) as an example of good practice.

Dr Peter Chamberlain, GP and lead clinician for strategy and innovation at NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “Our population in south Sefton is getting older at a much higher rate than the national average, which is why we’ve developed CHIP. The number of residents being sent in and out of hospital has always been a cause for concern as we know it’s not good for their mental or physical health. A huge factor of our training is to allow patients to be treated in the place they live to cause as little upset as possible.

“Bringing together the different elements of care into one program differentiates us from others and we are very proud of the CHIP initiative. The community matrons and our care home staff do a fantastic job and are highly trained in dealing with many situations. The regular collaborative meetings also work well and encourage integrated working to ensure that each resident receives the best care for them.”

An important element of CHIP is the televideo system which is now in most care homes in south Sefton. The use of televideo offers care home staff with a range of NHS services through a single point of contact, 24 hours a day, providing community based alternatives to going to A&E.

Chamberlain continues: “We are always looking to improve the programme and it’s fantastic that we are starting to see the results from the use of televideo in south Sefton. The aim of this is to prevent residents having to go into hospital when they don’t need to and more importantly improving the quality of experience for patients. With the right advice and by being able to see the patient through video the skilled team can manage most situations from Airedale NHS Foundation Trust.”

Bernadette Makaza Muzavazi, home manager at Orrell Grange nursing home in Bootle, is just one of the people who have a CHIP success story. She said: “In December one of our residents suddenly became critically ill becoming increasingly agitated and distressed as his breathing started to become laboured.

She said: “As soon as this was noticed, one of the staff quickly dialled Airedale. While they were talking to them, a senior carer completed the communication form and took all the physical observations, while one of the nurses was reassuring the resident and keeping an eye on him at all times.

“The practitioner asked us to take the televideo laptop to the resident’s room so she could see the resident. While this was all taking place, a paramedic was in attendance and took over doing all the physical observations including an electrocardiogram (ECG) on the patient’s heart. The ambulance crew arrived in 20 minutes in case the resident had to proceed to the hospital.

“As the resident was becoming more settled and the paramedic requested for a GP visit on site the ambulance crew was sent back. The GP visited and prescribed antibiotics and steroids. The resident made a full recovery and was treated in the comfort of his own familiar environment surrounded by familiar faces.

“Prior to CHIP and Orrell Grange using telemedicine, this would have been a typical 999 call with all the hospital drama. Research shows that hospital environment or change of environment has detrimental effects to elderly people and especially people who suffer from Dementia.

“We all had a group hug following this CHIP success story. It was a good job well done, professionally and efficiently.

“Thank you to the CHIP team for adding in the use of televideo and to Airedale for arranging all three services within a short space of time. We had a paramedic, ambulance crew and a GP in attendance within a short space of time. Well done Orrell Grange staff too, 90% of our staff are now confident and competent with using tele video through training and practice organised by the CCG.”

Peter Chamberlain at the CCG said: “Bernadette’s story is just one of the many we receive and it highlights the televideo element of CHIP which is only one aspect of the program. It is fantastic to see it all coming together and to hear that it’s working. The team here at the CCG has worked hard to combine the different initiatives and to roll them out to all our care homes. The training through the collaborative meetings and through Edge Hill University is invaluable for staff giving them more confidence when caring for residents. We are now starting to see the results and this is only one example.”

CCGs make the final of prestigious student awards

A joint scheme between NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS South Sefton CCG made it into the final shortlist at the Student Nursing Times Award.

The CCGs were nominated along with seven others in the ‘Student Placement of the Year – Community’ category, after becoming the first accredited hub in the country to offer bespoke placement opportunities to student nurses.

Through the placement scheme the CCGs provide students with a structured learning environment, offering them the support and experience they need for their future careers. The placements that the CCGs offer introduce pre-registration student nurses, student quality ambassadors (SQAs) and care makers into a commissioning setting in order to improve quality of care.

The collaborative work the CCGs have been doing with Edge Hill University and the North West Placement Development Network (NWPDN) means that students are mentored by the quality team at the CCGs with the opportunity to interact with board level professionals and attend high level strategic meetings. They are also given the opportunity to input into the development of the CCGs’ strategic plans and commissioning priorities to ensure that quality of care of patients remain at the centre of what they do in a complex commissioning environment.

Brendan Prescott, deputy chief nurse for both CCGs, said: “We were so thrilled to have been shortlisted for this award.

“We are proud of what we have achieved and have worked extremely hard to put the student placements together working with Edge Hill University and NWPDN, so it means a lot to us all that this has been recognised.”

Sheila Ollerhead, Associate Head of Nursing at Edge Hill said: “The collaborative work Edge Hill University has been doing with the CCGs and the NWPDN means that students have developed an understanding of how a CCG operates within a local economy and have gained first-hand experience of how decisions are made at a strategic and commissioning level.

“The scheme enhances student understanding of the skills to being an effective leader and an ability to form relationships within and across agencies. Importantly, it provides an avenue for newly qualified nurses to explore a future career within a CCG.

“The ability to offer students such high level placement opportunities is a great platform for attracting potential students to undertake a degree in Nursing at Edge Hill. A huge well done to the CCG for making it into the final shortlist.”

These awards are the only one of its kind to celebrate the very best in student nurses and nurse education. They pay tribute to student nurses who have demonstrated the academic achievement, clinical prowess and personal qualities that will make them brilliant nurses.

The event was held at the London Hilton on Park Lane on 28 April. For more details see: www.studentawards.nursingtimes.net

Doctors thank Aintree colleagues for support in £100,000 fundraising campaign as Nepal marks a year on from the earthquake which killed thousands

Leading doctors have presented Aintree University Hospital with a thank you plaque to mark support for a fundraising appeal to provide earthquake disaster and recovery support in Nepal.

A 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the Himalayan country on 25 April 2015, killing 9,000 people and injuring more than 23,000.

Health Exchange Nepal (HExN), a small charity established to support educational links between the NHS and Nepalese medical services, launched a relief appeal which raised £100,000.

Dr Shambhu Acharya, HExN committee member, said:

“Many clinicians at Aintree University Hospital supported us with donations, fundraising and offers of help. Initially we supplied immediate disaster relief, such as survival kits and shelters. More funds were used to rebuild schools and supply hospitals, and assist local Nepalese charities. A year on from the earthquake, we are now helping develop the Nepalese medical services over a longer term, including supporting more rehabilitation services, which are very limited.”

Surgeons from Aintree University Hospital took part in fundraising challenges which saw them go barefoot, and doctors, nurses and allied health professionals made donations at a special presentation event.

Steve Warburton, Chief Executive of Aintree University Hospital, who also took part in the fundraising challenge, said:

“Staff at Aintree really rallied round, and we are honoured to receive this recognition from Health Exchange Nepal. It really brings things home to you, when you hear of how donations of even a few pounds made such a difference to people in Nepal.”

There was strong support for the appeal from across Liverpool, including a fundraising evening at the Mayur Restaurant and a £10,000 donation from the Mersey School of Anaesthesia.

To donate to Health Exchange Nepal or to find out more, please visit www.hexn.org

Gill Brown appointed at Southport and Formby CCG

Gill Brown has been appointed as NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCG’s) new Governing Body lead for patient and public participation.

Joining the CCG as a lay representative, Gill was previously chief executive for Healthwatch Lancashire, which acts as the public voice for health and social care.

The chartered biomedical scientist from Southport has a number of years’ experience of working in the NHS in a variety of clinical, research, managerial and governance roles.

Commenting on her appointment, Gill said: “I’m honoured to be given this opportunity to join the Governing Body. These are very challenging times for the NHS and social care services and I hope the skills I bring from my previous roles at Healthwatch Lancashire and from my time working in hospital trusts will assist the CCG in fulfilling its responsibilities.”

She was the inaugural corporate secretary for The Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University NHS Trust and her final role before retirement from the NHS in 2014 was as director of corporate and research governance for The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust.

In 2013, Gill was the first member of the NHS to be awarded a national Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administrators’  ‘Excellence in Governance’ award, which she won for her innovative work and proactive engagement with NHS foundation trust governors.

Gill is also a co-opted governor for Southport College, is a member of the college’s Governance Committee and is a director of a company that specialises in the promotion of excellence in governance and engagement.

Chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, Dr Rob Caudwell, said: “We welcome Gill to the Governing Body and the wealth of experience she brings in championing patient and public participation and her knowledge of the NHS. We look forward to working with Gill and we’ve no doubt that her contribution will help us to better involve our residents in our work.”

Her appointment follows the retirement of Roger Pontefract from the Governing Body, who previously held the role since the creation of NHS Southport and Formby CCG in 2013.

Anyone with an interest in local health and services can hear Gill and other members of the Governing Body discussing and making decisions about the CCG’s work at its next meeting on Wednesday 25 May.

NHS Southport and Formby CCG holds bi-monthly Governing Body meetings in public. There is a chance for people to ask members of the Governing Body questions and queries prior to the start of the formal meeting at 1pm.

More information can be found on the NHS Southport and Formby CCG website www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk

New face for CCG Governing Body

Graham Bayliss has been appointed as NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCG’s) new Governing Body lead for patient and public involvement.

Graham joins the CCG as a lay representative after a long and successful career in Local Government, the last 23 of which has been with Sefton Council where he held several senior positions including director of corporate services and director of leisure and tourism.

Commenting on his appointment, Graham said: “I am delighted to have been appointed to the Governing Body of NHS South Sefton CCG, as the lay member for public and patient involvement.

“Having worked in south Sefton for many years I am aware of the challenges we face and the importance of engagement. I look forward to helping our communities and patients become even more involved in health issues, helping to ensure our voices continue to be heard by the NHS.”

Originally from London, Graham studied Geography at Liverpool University and joined Liverpool City Council’s Leisure Department in 1989. He then moved to Sefton in 1993 as chief sport and recreation officer, overseeing the construction of Bootle Leisure Centre.

Becoming director of leisure in 1999, Graham was responsible for improvement to north, south and Derby Parks amongst others. Whilst in this position he also developed a ground-breaking partnership with the NHS to develop the Active Sefton brand and GP referral service.

He has worked in Bootle for many years, liaising closely with communities in south Sefton and voluntary sector groups.

Chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, Dr Andrew Mimnagh, said: “We welcome Graham to the Governing Body and the wealth of experience he brings in championing patient and public participation. We look forward to working with Graham and we’ve no doubt that his contribution will help us to better involve our residents in our work.”

Graham’s appointment follows the retirement of Roger Driver from the Governing Body, who previously held the role since the creation of NHS South Sefton CCG in 2013.

Anyone with an interest in local health and services can hear Graham and other members of the Governing Body discussing and making decisions about the CCG’s work at its next meeting on Thursday 26 May.

NHS South Sefton CCG holds bi-monthly Governing Body meetings in public. There is a chance for people to ask members of the Governing Body questions and queries prior to the start of the formal meeting at 1pm.

More information can be found on the NHS South Sefton CCG website www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk

The Future for Dementia Care: Meeting the 2020 Challenge

Context:

The Government has recently published the Implementation Plan for the Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia 2020. Its commitments include personalised care plans, raising awareness and integrated health and social care provision. However, with budgets stretched and growing demand for support, how can your service integrate, innovative and improve to meet the challenges ahead?

Attend this Westminster Briefing event to learn about what the future holds for dementia care in the coming months and years. Engaging with our expert panel and your peers, you will explore the practical steps you can take to rise to the 2020 Challenge and provide personalised, quality support for people living with dementia and carers.

Key Issues to be Addressed Include:

  • What does the Implementation Plan mean for the future of dementia care?
  • Engaging with people living with dementia to improve your service
  • Providing personalised care plans for every person living with dementia
  • Driving integration between health, social care and third sector
  • Providing training and improving awareness across your workforce
  • Overcoming variations of diagnostic rates and support across areas
  • Building on the progress & momentum of Dementia Friendly Communities
  • Delivering better support for carers and families

The Event:

In the morning session you will explore the Government’s plans for supporting those living with dementia and the next steps for prevention, assessment and post-diagnostic care.

In the afternoon session you will learn from good practice case studies of supporting and engaging with people with dementia and their carers in personalised, community-based ways. The session will be highly interactive and provide practical guidance on how you can develop your local service

Morning refreshments will be served upon arrival with a networking lunch to follow. Any special needs or dietary requirements should be notified to us upon booking.

Who should attend?

Delegates will be drawn from anyone with an interest in dementia, including but not limited to: local authorities, CCGs, health & social care commissioners, care home managers, primary care staff, carers, charities, workforce development & training teams and elected members.

For registration enquiries please contact:
customer.services@westminster-briefing.com | 0207 593 5657

To discuss event sponsorship, speaking opportunities and agenda content, please email:
bruce.reilly@westminster-briefing.com

‘Think Local Act Personal’ – Care & Support Jargon Buster

The Care and Support Jargon Buster is a plain English guide to the most commonly used social care words and phrases and what they mean. The definitions are plain English rather than legal, and were developed and tested by a steering group that included people who use services, carers, representatives from local authorities, information providers and key stakeholders from across the social care sector.

The Care and Support Jargon Buster won a Plain English Campaign Award in 2013.

Click here to visit the Jargon Buster website.

Are you eligible for bowel cancer screening?

Bowel cancer is the second biggest cancer killer in the UK. However it shouldn’t be because it is treatable and curable, especially if diagnosed early.

Taking part in bowel cancer screening is the best way to get diagnosed early which is why the UK’s leading bowel cancer research charity, Bowel Cancer UK, is using Bowel Cancer Awareness Month to focus on screening.

Screening can save lives but at the moment in some areas of the UK only a third of those who receive a test complete it. Thousands of people are missing out on the chance to detect bowel cancer early when it is easier to treat.

If you are over 60, take the test when you receive it in the post. If you are younger, tell the people over 60 (or over 50 in Scotland) in your life, to take the test.

For more information about screening visit the Bowel Cancer UK website.

Get active with ‘Everybody Active’!

The Sefton Council/Sport England scheme ‘Everybody Active’ is running fitness classes and sessions across Sefton to help you keep fit and healthy. You can keep up to date by joining this facebook group and checking the website for the latest information.

See below for the weekly timetable of classes and if you’d like to know more contact everybody.active@sefton.gov.uk or call 0151 934 2355.

Everybody active timetable.PNG

New Autism support group launches in Southport

Access Sefton has joined forces with Sefton Living Well Centre to launch a new autism support group.

Anyone who has autism, Asperger’s syndrome or cares for someone who has these conditions are invited to the first meeting of the group on Thursday 31 March.

You can also find out more about local support services in your area and meet new people. View more information here.