Men are encouraged to look after their health this November

It’s November, which means that as a part of ‘Movember’, health teams in Sefton are focusing on men’s health this month.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are encouraging men in the area to look after their health and make sure they know about some of the most common health problems that could affect them.

Pregnant women in Sefton urged to get their flu jab

Pregnant women across the borough are being urged by Sefton Council, NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG to make sure they get the flu jab this winter.

Local NHS Services thanked for hard work during ‘cyber attack’

Staff at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have thanked clinical and IT staff for their hard work to make sure patient services were maintained without any disruption following the recent cyber attack.

IT staff worked hard to recover computers that were attacked by the virus and the general practices saw patients with appointments throughout the week. Those people who had appointments with community services were also reassured that community services had introduced a temporary system to make sure that patients could be seen as normal.

Services at Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust have now returned to normal following the cancellation of some planned services last week.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “Staff across the NHS in Sefton worked extremely hard to ensure that patient care was maintained and that no services were forced to close.

“Many staff literally worked round the clock the weekend it happened to ensure that any service disruption was kept to a minimum and we are really grateful for that.”

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “We’d like to say a personal thank you to all the staff who gave up their own time and for their commitment and support to keeping local NHS services up and running.”

Change of dates for CCG health meetings

Health commissioners in have released revised dates for their bi-monthly governing body meetings, which residents are welcome to attend to hear more about their local NHS.

It means that the governing body meeting for NHS South Sefton CCG will now take place in early May, a month earlier than previously advertised.

Chief officer, Fiona Taylor, explained: “Governing bodies are the CCGs most important business meetings where members of the group discuss and make decisions about local health services.

“We’ve moved our meetings to earlier in the month so information presented to the governing bodies is more timely, and we have changed the month when they are held so they fall outside the main summer holiday period to give as many people as possible the chance to come along and listen in to our discussions.”

CCGs are responsible for planning and buying, or ‘commissioning’ the majority of local health services and governing bodies are accountable for their work. The NHS organisations welcome anyone with an interest in their work to come along and listen to the discussions of the doctors, nurses, health professionals and lay representatives who make up the governing bodies.

All governing body meetings start at 1pm and time is set aside before they formally begin for people to ask any questions they might have.

The next governing body meeting take place on Thursday 4 May, 3rd floor, Merton House, Stanley Rd, Bootle

Anyone who would like to come along is asked to call 0151 247 7000 to confirm their attendance.

A full schedule of the new governing body meeting dates can be found on our website http://www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk

Working together – Sefton and Liverpool CCGs

During March the governing bodies of NHS South Sefton, NHS Southport and Formby and NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGS) are expected to agree steps to come together through a formal merger from 1 April 2018.

It follows a series of discussions between the governing bodies beginning in November 2016 exploring the benefits of becoming a single commissioning entity for Sefton and Liverpool. A resulting proposal setting out the steps towards a merger will be presented at the three CCG governing body meetings during March.

The governing bodies believe a merger is the best way to strengthen local commissioning and improve outcomes for our different populations. They feel they will be able to better maximise of the resources and assets available to them by consolidating clinical leadership and working more efficiently during this financially challenging time for the NHS.

Already their transformational programmes – Shaping Sefton and Healthy Liverpool – are coming together through the North Mersey Local Delivery System, and a merger will unite this work.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “Together we believe we will be able to do more to improve the health of our populations, by maximising our collective resources and assets to strengthen our work as commissioners during this challenging time for the NHS.”

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “Importantly, this single commissioning organisation will only be effective if it retains the local focus and progress made by each CCG since we were established in 2013, continuing to work closely with our member GP practices, council partners, wider communities and distinct populations.”

Dr Nadim Fazlani, chair of NHS Liverpool CCG, said: “By retaining the local talent, skills, experience and focus of the existing organisations, our patients will benefit from a stronger CCG, capable of meeting the challenges we’re facing in the NHS, to ensure we continue to commission high quality healthcare into the future.”

NHS England and the CCGs’ member GP practices will need to formally approve a merger, and talks with these parties will begin in April 2017.

Chief officer of Sefton CCG’s celebrates 35 years of NHS service

Chief officer of NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG has reached 35 years of service at the NHS and is marking the occasion in several ways.

Fiona Taylor, who joined the NHS in 1982 the age of 17, has recently become Trustee of St Ann’s Hospice in Manchester and has also joined the board of Advancing Quality Alliance (AQUA).

Talking about reaching this momentous occasion Fiona said: “I can’t believe it’s been 35 years, it has flown by but I have to say I’ve enjoyed every minute. I do honestly love coming to work and regularly tell my colleagues that I enjoy what I do because I am so passionate about working for the NHS. It’s not always easy and I’m the first to say that but I have loved all the experiences I have had over the years in various roles and am proud to say I have been with the NHS for 35 years.

“I am very much looking forward to working with St Ann’s Hospice, they do a fantastic job and fingers crossed I can support them in key decision making and help to make a difference. It’s also great to be working with AQuA, at the forefront of transforming safety and quality in healthcare across the North West and I am looking forward to working with them on a more formal basis alongside my chief officer role of course.”

Fiona started her career in the NHS in Salford as a registered general nurse before going on to become a midwife and health visitor. Between 1990 and 1992 Fiona worked as a paediatric liaison health visitor leading service redesign before moving from a clinical role into management.

In 1999, Fiona left Salford to become deputy director of nursing and then acting director of nursing in Mancunian Community Health Trust, later joining Bradford City Teaching Primary Care Trust (PCT) in 2001. Since then, Fiona has worked at director level and held a variety of roles and portfolios, including acting chief executive of Bradford City Teaching PCT. In 2012 Fiona was appointed chief officer of the two CCG’s in Sefton so has been in that role for five years now.

St Ann’s Hospice cares and helps thousands of patients (over the age of 16) and their families and carers every year who are affected by cancer and non-cancer life limiting illnesses. The staff deliver care that is special and unique to each individual person. Around 40% of inpatients at St Ann’s Hospice return home after treatment.

The Advancing Quality Alliance (AQuA) was established in 2010 to improve health and care quality in the North West. It has over 70 member organisations who it works with on a long term basis.

Public welcome at local CCG meetings

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Sefton have announced the dates of their first governing body meetings for 2017 and are encouraging anyone with an interest to go along.

The CCGs’ hold their bi-monthly governing body meetings in public, so people can hear them discussing and making decisions about local health services.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals who make up the committees will discuss a range of issues including the performance of the services they commission, like hospitals and community care.

Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “The governing body is a formal meeting and it’s a way for people to find out more about what we’re doing. They can also ask us any questions ahead of the meeting getting underway.”

Andy Mimnagh, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG chair, said: “The meetings are also a chance for residents to meet some of the doctors and other professionals that make up the governing body and to listen in on the discussions taking place.”

The NHS Southport and Formby CCG meeting will take place on Wednesday 25 January at the Family Life Centre, Ash St, Southport, Merseyside, PR8 6JH, at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

The NHS South Sefton CCG meeting will take place on Thursday 26 January at Merton House, Stanley Road in Bootle at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings   

Anyone who is interested in attending is asked to call 0151 247 7000 to confirm their attendance.

Options for the future of Liverpool Women’s hospital published

Four options for the future of services provided by Liverpool Women’s hospital have been published.

The options have been developed as part of a review of women’s and neonatal services, which began in March 2016 and is being led by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) as part of its Healthy Liverpool programme.

The Healthy Liverpool programme is looking at hospital services across north Merseyside (covering Knowsley, Liverpool and Sefton) as part of its work.

This review is being delivered by Liverpool CCG in partnership with Liverpool Women’s, with support from South Sefton CCG and Knowsley CCG, whose patients also use these services.

Aintree University Hospital, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital and the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals are also closely involved.

The review is happening because the needs of patients have changed since Liverpool Women’s opened more than 20 years ago.

Women are living longer and having babies later in life, while advances in medicine mean more premature and unwell babies are surviving when they wouldn’t have in the past.

This means patients require more complex care which isn’t always available at the Women’s, so many women have to be transferred to other hospitals before they can receive appropriate care, including some of the most seriously ill women. There are also new standards of care which the Women’s is unable to meet in its current location.

The review has involved staff from NHS organisations across the city, including midwives, nurses and doctors from the Women’s and other hospitals. The public were also asked for their views on the case for change at the hospital last summer, and these were used to develop the four options.

The options are:

  • Relocate women’s and neonatal services to a new hospital building on the same site as the new Royal Liverpool Hospital
  • Relocate women’s and neonatal services to a new hospital building on the same site as Alder Hey Children’s Hospital
  • Make major improvements to Liverpool Women’s Hospital on the current Crown Street site
  • Make smaller improvements to the current Crown Street site.

The options are included in a draft pre-consultation business case (PCBC), which was presented to the Board of Liverpool Women’s today and which is available for the public to download at www.healthyliverpool.nhs.uk.

The PCBC is a detailed technical document which explains how these options have been developed and how a preferred option was chosen.

The preferred option is to relocate women’s and neonatal services to a new hospital building on the same site as the new Royal Liverpool Hospital. This is because it offers the most benefits for patients and provides solutions to the challenges set out in the case for change, including improved safety and patient experience, reduced transfers of patients and less separation of mothers and babies. This option is judged to support long term clinical and financial sustainability and best value for money.

Dr Fiona Lemmens, Clinical Director for the Healthy Liverpool Hospitals Programme, said: “It is really important to us that this is an open and transparent process. We hope that publishing the draft business case will help the public understand what we’re doing and see how the views they shared with us last summer are being used to shape the future of these services. We want to ensure women and newborns receive the very best care possible and we believe the preferred option will allow us to do this.”

Andrew Loughney, Medical Director at Liverpool Women’s, said: “Midwives, nurses and doctors at Liverpool Women’s have been central to developing options for the future as part of this review. We are confident that the preferred option is best placed to enable us to address the main issues facing our patients. Moving to a new purpose built building would mean that we could provide the very best care for future generations of people in Merseyside.”

All four options would require significant capital investment and NHS England and NHS Improvement, the regulators for the NHS, have asked that further work is now done to develop detailed funding plans. This work needs to show how capital funding could be secured and demonstrate that it represents value for money. It is recognised that this presents a challenge in the current environment of constrained NHS resources.

At the same time, the final version of the PCBC needs to reflect the findings of a broader review of neonatal services, which is currently being undertaken by the Cheshire and Merseyside Neonatal Network and which will report in the spring of 2017.

Once this additional work is completed a final version of the business case will be submitted to NHS England for approval. If NHS regulators are assured there is a sound case to invest, the options will go out to formal public consultation, giving the public an opportunity to share their views on detailed proposals for the future of women’s and neonatal services.

Dr Lemmens added: “I want to stress that this is an ongoing process and no final decisions will be made until the conclusion of any future public consultation.”

Members of the public who want to be kept informed can sign up at www.healthyliverpool.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.

Help yourself to stay healthy this winter

Health leaders at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are encouraging people this self-care week (14-20 November) to be aware of how they can look after themselves this winter and to examine their options should they become ill.

By keeping fit and healthy, individuals can take control of their own health, manage minor illnesses and effectively manage long term conditions.

If you do need further help, think carefully and examine your options available across Sefton. For example, think about using NHS 111 for advice as they can direct you to the appropriate service. Go to your local chemist for advice if you need it, they can offer assistance on minor ailments and common illnesses.

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “It’s important that people know when and how they can treat themselves and when they should seek further advice. By taking simple steps to look after yourself this winter, you can have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing.

“When it comes to treating minor ailments and illnesses, it’s important to examine your options. You can get plenty of advice from your local chemist as well as on the NHS Choices website. Remember, the accident and emergency departments and ambulance services are for life-threatening conditions. By selecting the right option, you can help the NHS to direct their focus to the patients who need it the most.”

The week compliments the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, encouraging people to look after themselves during the winter months – reminding them to see a pharmacist if they need advice on managing cough or cold symptoms; and for older people, a reminder to keep warm during the winter months by putting on an extra layer or turning up their heat.

More information on how everyone can use self-care to improve their health and wellbeing is available on the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk. And for more information on the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, visit: www.nhs.uk/staywell

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care. There are a variety of services that can support you to do this:

Pharmacy Services

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can help you prepare for many of the common illnesses like coughs and colds.

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies and dentists in your local area by visiting the NHS.uk website: http://www.nhs.uk. It also includes a symptom checker.

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: http://www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

Patients can also manage their health needs at home using Patient Access which is available on desktop or as a free app where you can arrange appointments, order repeat medications and update your personal details.*

For more information on Patient Access visit: https://patient.emisaccess.co.uk/account/login or watch this video for more information: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRM5YzabvVc

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

For more information please visit www.examineyouroptions.info

*please note that some practices may use a slightly different system to patient access so it is worth asking your GP practice for more information

Hear more about your local NHS (CCG Governing Body Meeting – 30-31st March)

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Sefton have announced the dates of their next governing body meetings and are encouraging anyone with an interest to go along.

The CCGs’ hold their bi-monthly governing body meetings in public, so people can hear them discussing and making decisions about local health services.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals who make up the committees will discuss a range of issues including the performance of the services they commission, like hospitals and community care.

Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “The governing body is a formal meeting and it’s a way for people to find out more about what we’re doing. They can also ask us any questions ahead of the meeting getting underway.”

Andy Mimnagh, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG chair, said: “The meetings are also a chance for residents to meet some of the doctors and other professionals that make up the governing body and to listen in on the discussions taking place.”

The NHS Southport and Formby CCG meeting will take place on Wednesday 30 March at The Family Life Centre, Ash Street, Southport at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southportformbyccg.org.uk/?page_id=343.

The NHS South Sefton CCG meeting will take place on Thursday 31 March at Merton House, Stanley Road in Bootle at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southseftonccg.org.uk/?page_id=212.

Anyone who is interest in attending is asked to

Sefton Veterans Project helps Seaforth hero receive his father’s lost medals

A WAR hero from Seaforth has been formally presented with the medals of his father who served in the First World War.

Henry Edward Whetnall, 89, was joined by other veterans at the Bowersdale Centre where they were given medals in a touching ceremony attended by the Mayor of Sefton and MP Peter Dowd.

Henry, who served for his country during the 1939-45 period in a bomb disposal team in Palestine, has social media to thank for helping to reunite him with his father’s medals.

The Champion reported in February 2015 how the ex-serviceman was given his own medals which he had lost after getting help from Sefton Veteran’s Project.

The group then shared the story on social media and Henry’s distant cousin, Rita, who lives in America, spotted it while researching her own family tree and decided to get in touch.

She helped Henry locate his father’s medals and a presentation was held on Wednesday, March 2.

David Smith of Expect Ltd and Project Manager of the Sefton Veterans Project, said: “It was an incredible story last year. When Henry told us about his missing medals, we worked hard to track them down from the Ministry of Defence, and it was a very moving presentation.

“As soon as Rita got in touch, we knew we had to present Henry with his father’s original medals to give the honour and respect both men deserved.”

Sefton Veterans Project is delivered by the charity Expect Ltd, a charity providing services to people living with learning disability and mental health problems.

The project’s primary focus is the mental wellbeing of ex-service personnel and their families, and part of its work is to track down and reunite veterans with their missing medals.

Two other local veterans, Tess Cameron and Colin Johnson, joined Henry last week as they also received lost medals.

Tess, who served in the Royal Navy from 1943-46, was reunited with her Second World War General Service Medal and Colin, who served in the Royal Green Jackets, received the Long Service and Good Conduct medal, awarded after 18 years of service.

David added: “Reuniting veterans with lost medals is just one aspect of our work.

“We believe it’s incredibly important to formally acknowledge these military honours.

“It’s bringing back pride, recognising those who risked their lives, and not forgetting theirs and their fallen comrades’ sacrifices.”

The medals were presented by Commodore Gary Doyle, a senior Royal Navy officer and the new regional commander for Northern England and the Isle of Man.

Sefton Sexual Health Service teenager campaign hits 50,000 milestone!

More than 50,000 condoms have been distributed to Sefton teenagers as part of a campaign to encourage safer sex.

Sefton Sexual Health Service has been running a condom distribution scheme for young people aged between 13 and 19 since 2008.

Known as the “C-Card” scheme, it has seen more than 50,000 condoms given out.

To mark National Condom Week, which starts on Valentine’s Day, Sefton Sexual Health Service is out and about during February speaking to young people.

The team will visit sixth forms and further education colleges to promote sexual health. Special promotional condoms will be distributed from jars during this time.

Ann Morris, C-Card coordinator, said: “The C-Card scheme has been a big success and we are delighted to have provided advice to many thousands of young people over the last eight years. To mark National Condom Week, we will be out and about throughout February distributing condoms.”

National Condom Week educates young adults about serious risks involved with unprotected sex. This includes the risk of catching and spreading sexually transmitted infections as well as preventing unwanted pregnancies.

Sefton Sexual Health Services provides advice on all contraceptive methods, sexually transmitted infection testing and treatments including HIV, free condoms and pregnancy tests. It has a new website here: www.seftonsexualhealth.co.uk

Information on where to register for Sefton C-Card can be found at the website or on the Sefton C-Card Facebook page.

Did you know …?

  • Condoms date back to Roman times when animal bladders were used
  • The first rubber condoms was introduced in 1855
  • Japan accounts for more than a quarter of all condom sales
  • Condoms are still your only protection from someone else’s sexually transmitted infection (other than not having sex)

NHS South Sefton CCG: Sefton veterans inspire local NHS staff

A doctor’s surgery in Bootle has donated funds to the Sefton Veterans Project following a memorable talk from the leader of the project and ex-military himself, David Smith.

It follows a training session, organised by NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) late last year to raise awareness of the Sefton wide project and the work it does to support military veterans.

Practice staff heard how David faced issues in adjusting to life outside the forces after 25 years of service and how he now works for the charity, Expect Ltd. Following discussions, the charity decided to start up the Sefton Veterans Project with the primary focus being the mental health issues ex service personnel frequently suffer on discharge from the armed forces.

The staff at Moore Street Surgery were so touched by the talk that they decided to donate £100 collected from a dress down day to the project.

Practice Manager at Moore Street Surgery, Helen Shillcock said: “Dave and the other veterans talk was so inspiring, it really made us think about how referrals to the project can seriously help veterans by giving them the support that they need.

“When you hear about how Dave and some of the other veterans have turned their lives around and are now helping others like them it is so motivating. We held a dress down day a while back and raised £100, we knew all along that the Sefton Veterans Project was where we wanted to donate the money to and they truly deserve it for all their hard work.”

The Sefton Veterans Project is managed by Expect Ltd, a charity providing services for people living with a learning disability or enduring mental health problems, and is an initiative between Sefton Council, Sefton CVS and the two CCGs in Sefton who have helped to develop the veterans strategy for Sefton.

Together, they have established a one stop facility in Expects Bowersdale Resource Centre, Seaforth for ex-service personnel and their families to provide help and advice with mental wellbeing housing, employment, dependency and financial issues. They also provide mentor support when referring to specialist mental health experts who fully understand a veteran’s needs and issues such as combat stress.

Dave Smith from the Sefton Veterans Project said: “We were overwhelmed when the surgery told us they’d like us to have the money. It is great to know that the talks that we do are so effective when really it’s just informing the public of what services we offer as a project and what experience we have been through to warrant such a service.

“The money will be put towards a retreat that we are taking some of our veterans on in Scotland in May and we are extremely grateful to the practice for choosing us. It is so important that people know about our service and that military veterans are referred to us so that we can help. It is so nice to give something back to those who have been through similar experiences.

”A huge thank you goes to Angela Curran, Locality Development Support at the CCG for organising the talk which has led to more referrals to the Sefton Veteran Project.”

For more information visit: www.liverpoolveterans.co.uk/services/sefton-veterans

The NHS currently provides 12 mental health services across England specifically for veterans. They enable specialist staff to care for ex-forces personnel with mental health needs, direct them to the most appropriate service and give them effective treatment.

To help improve future care across the country NHS England are asking armed forces veterans to share their experience of mental health services.

The launch of their national survey will help improve the care available for veterans as they move from military to civilian life.

The survey is a chance for veterans to share their experiences and views of existing mental health services and to understand the reasons why some people have not sought or received support and treatment. You can complete the questionnaire here.

Fire Support Network’s Remove to Improve project – Freephone number now available

The Fire Support Network has launched a FREEPHONE number 0800 953 0065 to give people support and advice regarding keeping themselves safe in their own homes and help with clearing clutter or keeping gardens tidy.

Also as part of their CCG-funded project – Remove to Improve – they can offer Sefton residents a free property and lifestyle MOT visit to minimise hazards and risks, optimise self-care and prevent admission to hospital. As a result of the visit, the resident could get help with things such as grab rails, hand rails, a key safe, external security lighting. Basically, small interventions that can minimise the risk of falls. People just need to ring the FREEPHONE number above and ask about the property and lifestyle visits.

South Sefton CCG to hold event in support of World Cancer Day

In support of World Cancer Day, NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is holding a raft of events at the recently opened Strand by Me shop in Bootle.

Global World Cancer Day takes place on 4 February uniting the planet population in the fight against cancer. It aims to save millions of preventable deaths each year by raising awareness and educating people about the illness.

The event at the community and health shop inside Bootle’s Strand shopping centre will take place over five days from Monday 1 February. It will see the CCG, Macmillan Cancer Support, Cancer Research UK, Aintree University Hospital and Sefton Pensioners’ Advocacy Centre (SPAC) offering advice to those living with and beyond cancer.

WCD graphic

Dr Debbie Harvey, a Macmillan GP from NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “The event is a chance for those affected by cancer in the area to come together and meet like-minded people as well as getting some useful advice.

“We want to make it easier for people to get the information they need to support them living with cancer. People often say they are not aware of the help available locally so we want to improve that. We hope that this event builds awareness of what is out there in the community and is beneficial.”

A practice nurse from NHS South Sefton CCG will also be on site to speak to people about cervical cancer and how important it is for women to have regular screenings, following on from Cervical Cancer Prevention Week (24-30 January 2016).

Davina Hanlon, consultant and cancer screening lead at Public Health, Sefton Council, said: “We really support events like this as they are so beneficial in reminding people what is out there to support them. Thousands of lives are saved each year from people going for cancer screenings and I can’t stress enough how important it is to have them.

“There are three types of screenings; cervical for women aged 25-64, breast for 50-70 year old women and bowel which is a home testing kit offered to men and women aged 60-74. You will receive letters when you are due an appointment and I would urge you to book.”

The full schedule for the week-long event at Strand by Me is below:

  • Monday 1 February

Macmillan information and resources drop in

  • Tuesday 2 February

Specialist nurses from Aintree University Hospital will be on hand to speak to visitors about Breast, Bladder, Kidney, Prostate and Bowel Cancer.

  • Wednesday 3 and Thursday 4 February

Cancer Research UK will have ‘Smokerlyzer’ Carbon Monoxide breath tests and can offer BMI checks and general health checks over the two days.

A practice nurse from NHS South Sefton CCG will also be on site to chat to those affected by cancer and to encourage women to go for regular cervical screening tests.

  • Friday 5 February

Sefton Pensioners’ Advocacy Centre (SPAC) information day

No need to book, just pop in on the day and there is also a private room available for confidential meetings if required.

Strand by Me opened in September 2015 and is managed by Sefton CVS in partnership with NHS South Sefton CCG. For more information visit: www.seftoncvs.org.uk/strandbyme

NHS Southport and Formby CCG honoured at Health Business Awards

NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has received the clinical commissioning accolade at the Health Business Awards 2015.

Hosted by Doctor Mark Porter, medical correspondent for The Times and known for his work with BBC’s The One Show, the award ceremony took place at the Grange Hotel in St Paul’s, London. NHS Foundation Trusts, CCGs, Collaborates, Partnerships and Air Ambulance Services came together to celebrate the very best within the NHS.

The clinical commissioning award, sponsored by Fujitsu, recognised the recently formed CCG sector and an organisation which has quickly made an impact to reduce hospital admissions through preventative practice.

Sharon Forrester, cardiovascular disease programme lead at the CCG, who collected the award said: “As a CCG we are honoured to have received this award, it is fantastic that our work is being recognised and that it’s making a difference in Southport and Formby. Diabetes is a common health condition and it’s really important that patients have access to the right advice and treatment which we have worked hard to promote.

“A huge thanks to the health business awards for choosing us as the winner and for a fantastic event bringing NHS staff together.”

NHS England data ranked NHS Southport and Formby CCG as the best in the country in supporting adult diabetics to control their blood glucose levels in 2013/14. With approximately 6,500 people in the area living with diabetes, the CCG commissions diabetes services with a real focus on prevention, educating people on how to successfully manage the disease in order to reduce the risk of future complications.

The CCG also works to ensure that patients at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes have access to lifestyle advice to help them stay healthy and well.

Move More Southport and Formby

Move More Southport and Formby is a partnership between Active Lifestyles, Macmillan Cancer Support and Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group.

The programme aims to support anyone living with cancer to become more active. Offering its own physical and wellness activities, such as a gentle circuit class and relaxation session, a low impact chair class, yoga, as well as use of facilities at Dunes Leisure centre in Southport and Formby Pool at subsidised rate. As well as support in helping cancer patients in becoming more aware, it will facilitate their participation in physical activity sessions that are readily available locally within the community, targeted to specific needs and interests.

Research is providing a growing body of evidence that being physically active during and after cancer treatment helps to provide a variety of health and well-being benefits. Notable among these is a significant reduction in the risk of cancer recurrence for some patients.

Being active can help benefit cancer patients in a number of ways:
• Reduce tiredness and some treatment side effects
• Reduce anxiety and depression
• Improve your mood and quality of life
• Strengthen your muscles, joints and bones
• Look after your heart and reduce the risk of other health problems

Those referred to the programme will attend an initial appointment for a lifestyle review, and jointly agree with their coordinator an individualised physical activity and wellness plan. After 12 weeks of activity there will be another appointment to discuss on going activity and review of the programme. Physical activity prescription is adjusted according to treatment and health status. Our coordinators will monitor each person providing motivational support throughout the 12 week period and also up to a year post referral to help ensure their continuation of a healthy lifestyle.

Those Suitable for the Move More Programme Include:
Those who have had a cancer diagnosis- post surgery, and post treatment.
Plus any of the following will also be suitable for referral:

• Obesity (BMI 30-39)
•  Morbid obesity (BMI >39)
•  Hypertension (>180/100)
•  Mental health problems (medicated and stable)
•  IGR
•  Diabetes Type I and II
•  Stable treated angina
•  Heart Failure (not acute or unstable, via phase III only)
•  Post MI or re-vascular surgery AND: Completed Cardiac Rehabilitation with an ETT and clinically stable, awaiting no further investigations.

Referral to the programme can be made by your Cancer clinical nurse specialist, GP or practice nurse.

If you would like more information about the programme please contact Lucy Holmes or Tess Harrison (Macmillan Physical activity and Wellness coordinators) on 0151 934 2352 or email on active.lifestyles@sefton.gov.uk .

Ask Your Pharmacy week launches in Sefton…

Pharmacists in Sefton’s two clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) will be reminding residents about the range of services available in local chemists, and encouraging them to make appropriate use of NHS services during Ask Your Pharmacist week (9-15 November). 

Often, people make unnecessary trips to the GP or even A&E, when their neighbourhood chemist could help instead. In recent years, pharmacists have expanded their role, and now provide a wide range of clinical and public health services, within easy reach of the people who need them most. However, whilst most people go first to their chemist for medicines and medicines advice, many don’t know about the range of other healthcare services on offer in chemists.

NHS South Sefton CCG and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have made this easier with their Care at the Chemist scheme, providing fast expert advice and medications for a wide range of conditions, without the need for a doctor’s appointment.  

Mr Wear, who has been visiting Ryders Chemist in Formby since 1988, said: “I have been coming here a long time now and the pharmacists have always been approachable. I use Care at the Chemist a lot and find it extremely useful, the advice they give is invaluable and it can save a lot of time rather than getting an appointment at the doctors.”  

Susanne Lynch is the CCGs’ head of medicines management and the Sefton mum of two and uses Care at the Chemist if her boys are under the weather.

Susanne said: “Our Care at the Chemist service helps keep people up to speed with what is now on offer on their doorstep in pharmacies – a uniquely accessible healthcare professional workforce who can deliver expert medicines advice and an expanding list of public health services. 

“Your local pharmacist is a good first contact point for advice on many common health concerns – it is certainly mine. While most people will go first to their pharmacist for medicines advice, many don’t know about the range of other healthcare services provided by pharmacies on their doorstep and the level of expertise there.  Pharmacists are available without appointment and are able to deal with a wide range of ailments, as well as offering uniquely accessible advice on maintaining and improving your health. 

“Here in Sefton we promote this regularly through our Care at the Chemist scheme but this awareness week will promote this wider and will hopefully alert patients to the services on offer at the chemists on their doorsteps.” 

Activities are planned across the country during Ask Your Pharmacist Week including health checks in shopping centres, community talks, chemist window displays and visits to chemists by local dignitaries. 

Anyone of any age who is registered with a Sefton GP can get Care at the Chemist. Simply call into your chemist and ask to be registered onto the scheme. It is best if you use your usual chemist but if you are using one that does not know you; you will be asked to bring proof of identity. 

CQC Inspectors Highlight Outstanding and Good Care as Reports are Published…

The Chief Inspector of General Practice has found another 50 GP practices to be Good following recent inspections by the Care Quality Commission.

This week, CQC has published a further 65 reports on the quality of care provided by GP practices that have been inspected by specialist teams of inspectors.

Of those, 50 of the practices have been rated as Good, ten have been rated Requires Improvement, two have been rated Outstanding, two have been rated Inadequate and one was a focused inspection.*

Under CQC’s new programme of inspections, all of England’s GP practices are being given a rating according to whether they are safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led. 77 GP practices have been rated as Outstanding so far.  

Professor Steve Field, Chief Inspector of General Practice, said:

“After more than 2,000 inspections we now have the evidence that the vast majority of England’s GP practices are providing a service which is safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led. We have also found so many practices going far beyond the call of duty to care for patients to provide an outstanding service to their patients.

“But, unfortunately, there are still areas of practice that are inadequate and unacceptable. Patients have a right to expect high quality care from every GP practice. Where improvement is required we will expect the practice to take the necessary steps to address the issues and we will re-inspect at a later date to check that those improvements have been made.

“Practices rated Inadequate that are put into Special Measures are offered additional support by NHS England which is working with the RCGP to help the practice get back on track. We have already seen the benefits of this approach when we re-inspect.”

Full reports on all 65 inspections are available at: http://www.cqc.org.uk

Click Here for GP Practices listed by CCG area and rating

NHS CCGs in Southport, Formby and West Lancashire are encouraging people to ‘Help yourself to stay healthy this winter…’

NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Southport, Formby and West Lancashire are encouraging people this self-care week to be aware of how they can look after themselves this winter.

By keeping fit and healthy, individuals can take control of their own health, manage minor illnesses and effectively manage long-term conditions.

If you do need further help, think carefully and examine the number of options available to you across Southport, Formby and West Lancashire:

• Through the NHS Care at the Chemist (minor aliments) scheme your local pharmacist can provide confidential, expert advice and medicines for a range of common illnesses and ailments, without the need to see a GP.
• When your local GP surgery is closed call NHS 111, who will direct you to the appropriate service available to you in your area
• If you have a long-term condition, prepare for winter by ensuring you do not run out of your medication but do only order what you need. Many pharmacists offer repeat prescription services without the need to see your GP.
• Use 111 rather than calling 999 for non-emergencies. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Calls are free from landlines and mobile phones.
Claire Heneghan, chief nurse of NHS West Lancashire CCG, “It’s important that people know when and how they can treat themselves and when they should seek further advice. By taking simple steps to look after yourself this winter, you can have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing.”

Dr Robert Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “When it comes to treating minor ailments and illnesses, examine the options available to you. You can get plenty of advice from your local chemist as well as on the NHS Choices website. Remember, the accident and emergency departments and ambulance services are for life-threatening conditions. By selecting the right option, you can help the NHS to direct their focus to the patients who need it the most.”

More information on how everyone can use self-care to improve their health and wellbeing is available on the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk

Ask Your Pharmacy week launches in Sefton

Pharmacists in Sefton’s two clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) will be reminding residents about the range of services available in local chemists, and encouraging them to make appropriate use of NHS services during Ask Your Pharmacist week (9-15 November).

Often, people make unnecessary trips to the GP or even A&E, when their neighbourhood chemist could help instead. In recent years, pharmacists have expanded their role, and now provide a wide range of clinical and public health services, within easy reach of the people who need them most. However, whilst most people go first to their chemist for medicines and medicines advice, many don’t know about the range of other healthcare services on offer in chemists.

NHS South Sefton CCG and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have made this easier with their Care at the Chemist scheme, providing fast expert advice and medications for a wide range of conditions, without the need for a doctor’s appointment.

Mr Wear, who has been visiting Ryders Chemist in Formby since 1988, said: “I have been coming here a long time now and the pharmacists have always been approachable. I use Care at the Chemist a lot and find it extremely useful, the advice they give is invaluable and it can save a lot of time rather than getting an appointment at the doctors.”

Susanne Lynch is the CCGs’ head of medicines management and the Sefton mum of two and uses Care at the Chemist if her boys are under the weather.

Susanne said: “Our Care at the Chemist service helps keep people up to speed with what is now on offer on their doorstep in pharmacies – a uniquely accessible healthcare professional workforce who can deliver expert medicines advice and an expanding list of public health services.

“Your local pharmacist is a good first contact point for advice on many common health concerns – it is certainly mine. While most people will go first to their pharmacist for medicines advice, many don’t know about the range of other healthcare services provided by pharmacies on their doorstep and the level of expertise there.  Pharmacists are available without appointment and are able to deal with a wide range of ailments, as well as offering uniquely accessible advice on maintaining and improving your health.

“Here in Sefton we promote this regularly through our Care at the Chemist scheme but this awareness week will promote this wider and will hopefully alert patients to the services on offer at the chemists on their doorsteps.”

Activities are planned across the country during Ask Your Pharmacist Week including health checks in shopping centres, community talks, chemist window displays and visits to chemists by local dignitaries.

Anyone of any age who is registered with a Sefton GP can get Care at the Chemist. Simply call into your chemist and ask to be registered onto the scheme. It is best if you use your usual chemist but if you are using one that does not know you; you will be asked to bring proof of identity.

Jamie Carragher Opens New Health Service Shop – Strand By Me!

Liverpool FC legend Jamie Carragher was the VIP guest at the launch of a new community and health service shop in Bootle.

The former Reds defender officially opened the Strand By Me outlet at the Strand Shopping Centre, which will be used as a local base by a range of organisations working to improve the health and wellbeing of residents in the town.

Other guests at the launch included representatives of the partners in the new venture – NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Sefton CVS.

The Strand By Me shop – based on a an idea by GP practices in Bootle to make sources of support more accessible to residents – is available for organisations to hire to promote their health-related services and offer information and advice to local people.

These organisations include public sector health providers, charities and voluntary, community and faith sector groups, who offer support with everything from stopping smoking and welfare rights to keeping fit and ageing well.

Speaking at the launch Bootle-born Jamie – who also runs his own young people’s charity, the 23 Foundation – gave his enthusiastic backing to the new facility.

He said: “As a local lad I’m passionate about anything that helps to improve community services in Bootle and the health and wellbeing of the people who live here.

“This new shop is an exciting new resource for the area which will provide a base for a wide variety of organisations that can help to achieve these objectives.”

Dr Craig Gillespie, Chair of South Sefton CCG, said: “This is a good example of how our local GP practices are working together with partners like Sefton CVS to develop new services, and it’s great to see their idea for Strand By Me become a reality. We hope people find the shop useful in providing them with information and advice about their health and wellbeing and we’d encourage anyone to pop in and take a look for themselves.”

Sefton CVS Deputy Chief Executive, Nigel Bellamy, added: “Strand By Me demonstrates the strength of partnership working across the public, private and voluntary sectors.

For more information on Strand By Me email StrandByMe@seftoncvs.org.uk  or visit www.seftoncvs.org.uk/StrandByMe.