Six things you should expect from Social Care Support

According to Healthwatch England, people have told them they want to feel listened to and involved in decisions about their social care.

It says: “With more than a quarter of a million people living in care homes and 673,000 adults relying on social care support to live independently, it’s vital that people are able to get the best out of social care.

“The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has developed guidance to help make you and social care professionals understand what care people can expect and how to support you to make decisions about your own care.”

Healthwatch England list six things you should expect from care services, according to NICE guidelines.

  1. You should be able to live your life with dignity and independence.
  2. Your care should be planned flexibly around what you want and need.
  3. You should understand what types of care are available, and the minimum care you can expect to have.
  4. You should have control over how your care is provided and paid for.
  5. The staff providing care should develop good relationships with you.
  6. Providers of social care should ask you and your family for your views, and use these to train staff and improve services.

Healthwatch Sefton always welcomes feedback from people in Sefton. If you have an experience of social care then you can submit your feedback via our website using this link.

Healthwatch Sefton offers Independent Complaints Advocacy Service

Healthwatch Sefton now  offers an Independent Complaints Advocacy Service.

For anyone wanting to make a complaint about the care and/or treatment they have received from the NHS there are two options:

  • We have a pack of self-help materials which provides supportive information including the NHS complaints process and an example framework for a first letter of complaint
  • Or, if people prefer, there is a fully-trained advocate who can support people to make their complaint by providing free, confidential and independent help

More details of this service can be found on our website – https://healthwatchsefton.co.uk/independent-complaints-advocacy-service/

– along with a downloadable referral form and self-help pack.

If you want to discuss this service with the team then please contact Healthwatch Sefton on 0151 920 0726 ext 240.

Local Healthwatch to Revisit A&E

On Monday, 19 March staff and volunteers from local Healthwatch across Merseyside will be revisiting A&E departments in the region and talking to patients about the reasons for their visit.

A local Healthwatch spokesperson said: “We hope the simultaneous visits taking place from 9.30am to 12.30pm will provide a snapshot of why people use A&E and what people think about things like quality of care and waiting times.”

The first joint co-ordinated event took place last July when the majority of people said they had gone to A&E on the recommendation of a health professional. A follow up was due to take place in January but was postponed due to increased winter pressures and the flu outbreak.

A&E departments have been regularly in the headlines with usage rising, departments getting more pressured, waiting times growing and frontline staff working hard to give the care people need.

NHS England chief executive, Simon Stevens, said earlier this month: “It is quite likely February will turn out to have been the most pressurised month the NHS has seen in its nearly 70 year history.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Local Healthwatch and A&E departments that will be involved are:

  • Healthwatch Liverpool – Royal Liverpool and Alder Hey
  • Healthwatch Sefton – Southport Hospital
  • Healthwatch Knowsley – Aintree Hospital
  • Healthwatch St Helens – Whiston Hospital

Maureen Kelly, Chair of Healthwatch Sefton, says: “It will be interesting to hear the variety of reasons why people attend A&E, especially as our fellow local Healthwatch are asking the same questions in different parts of Merseyside. And the information gathered will be fed back in to providers and decision makers to help get our care right.”

Healthwatch Sefton wants to hear from anyone else who has recently used Southport Hospital’s A&E department by completing a short online survey on our website. Visit www.healthwatchsefton.co.uk or call 0800 206 1304 for further information.

Hospital Car Park Under Review

A review of a local hospital’s car park system has been welcomed by Healthwatch Sefton.

Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is currently considering changes to the ways in which patients and visitors can pay for parking on site and is canvassing views through a survey. A Trust spokesperson explained: “To help us take account of as many views as possible, we hope people will complete this short survey, which will take less than two minutes.”

Sefton GPs asked to keep things simple when seeking patient feedback

As part of the #ItStartsWithYou campaign, Healthwatch Sefton and the local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are calling on GP practices in Sefton, as the front line of the health service, to send a strong cultural signal to patients that the NHS is open and interested in listening to their views.

Healthwatch Sefton and the CCGs are also encouraging GPs and other primary care staff to share their own stories to tell them how patient feedback has helped them to learn and improve the way they provide care.

Local Big Latch On at Southport and Knowsley Safari

Between 1 and 7 August every year, to raise awareness of the benefits of breastfeeding and the need for global support, the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action organises World Breastfeeding Week.

World Breastfeeding Week, 1-7 August, is celebrated in 120 countries and marks the signing of the World Health Organisation and UNICEF document Innocenti Declaration, which lists the benefits of breastfeeding, plus global and governmental goals. UNICEF is the United Nations Children’s Fund, a worldwide children’s charity that address the needs of children around the world.

To mark this occasion, thousands of breastfeeding women and their babies and children across the world will gather in their own communities to take part in the Global Big Latch On, a synchronised breastfeeding event in multiple locations.

There are several taking place in Merseyside. Sefton’s local Big Latch On will take place at Lakeside Christian Centre, Fairway, Southport, PR9 0LA, on Friday, 4 August at 10.30am and there is also one at Knowsley Safari on the same day at the same time.

The Sefton event is hosted by Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust, and the Knowsley event is hosted by North West Boroughs Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, in partnership with the Merseyside Breastfeeding Consortium. Directions can be found at www.knowsleysafariexperience.co.uk or by putting L34 3AN into your Sat Nav.

Julia Kemp, Infant Feeding Coordinator at North West Boroughs Healthcare, said: “We are delighted to be hosting this event with our consortium partners. This event highlights the amazing work our services provide to support mothers and babies. We love to celebrate the achievements of our breastfeeding families and we hope all our past and present breastfeeding families, no matter what age, will join us to take part in this worldwide event.”

Richard Smith, Head of Visitor Services at Knowsley Safari, said: “We are delighted to support this event and welcome families to stay at the park for as long as they wish. There will be free access for participants and their family to our foot safari to see our animal displays and enjoy many of our attractions including giraffe, meerkat and wolf country. The park opens at 9am and all cars arriving before 10.15am will be offered a discount of £15 per car to enter the full safari tour.”

For more information about the Knowsley event contact the Knowsley Breastfeeding Peer Support Service on 0151 244 3269.

For more information about the Sefton event, contact Breastfeeding Support Sefton via the Feelgood Factory in Netherton 0151 291 8010 or on 07752 661408.

 

Healthwatch England’s ‘It Starts With You’Campaign wants to hear from you

Healthwatch Sefton, the local health and social care consumer champion, has been supporting Healthwatch England’s It Starts With You campaign with a number of initiatives within the borough.

Today (Wednesday) the Healthwatch Sefton team is at Strand House in Bootle to engage with those within the 123 flats and to capture any feedback on the health services they use.

Over the last year, more than 3,000 local residents have shared their stories with Healthwatch Sefton to help identify where things weren’t working and let doctors, nurses and care workers know when they were getting it right. The aim is for Wednesday’s visit to add to this picture by listening to what the residents have to say with all responses being anonymous.

This follows a co-ordinated Listening Event earlier in July when eight local Healthwatch visited Accident & Emergency departments throughout Cheshire and Merseyside at the same time, on the same day, and asking people the same questions from a pre-arranged survey.

Two members of Healthwatch Sefton spent the afternoon at Southport and Formby District General Hospital A+E department where they captured feedback from 24 people.

This information will be included in a wider Healthwatch report intended to gain insight as to why people attend A+E and where pressures elsewhere in the system may affect demand on the emergency department. It is hoped a follow-up survey will also add to the picture of A+E demand.

In another initiative to coincide with the It Starts With You campaign, Betty Boner, Healthwatch Sefton Engagement and Participation Officer, linked in with Southport and Ormskirk NHS Hospital Trust’s recent launch of their Experience of Care Strategy. Betty gathered people’s feedback at Southport Hospital on the different services provided at the site and shared comments such as: “I received fantastic aftercare” and “I meet up with other people who were (at the clinic) at the same time. We now support each other”.

The Healthwatch network exists to make it straightforward for people to give feedback about health and social care services. Healthwatch Sefton has made this easy by providing a specific Feedback Centre on its website (www.healthwatchsefton.co.uk) where people can also rate their GP practice, dental surgery or hospital clinic – all anonymously.

 

Dementia Friendly Housing Charter

Last month, Alzheimer’s Society produced the Dementia Friendly Housing Charter.

It is a guide for housing associations other organisations involved with residential services who support those living with dementia.

It contains some useful ideas around the  things to take into account around housing and those living with dementia.

See the guide by clicking here.

Healthwatch Sefton – Karen Jackson named interim chief executive

Karen Jackson has been appointed interim Chief Executive of Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust.

She succeeds Iain McInnes who has been interim Chief Executive since August. He is returning to a role with NHS Improvement, the national organisation responsible for overseeing NHS provider trusts.

Karen has most recently been working with NHS Improvement to lead work on improving urgent care service delivery across England.

Before this she was chief executive at North Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust and has a professional background in NHS finance. She is a graduate in genetics from the University of Liverpool.

Karen said: “I am very happy to be joining the team at Southport and Ormskirk. Even in my short time here I have been impressed with the commitment of staff to providing the very best care for patients. I look forward to supporting that effort and will be here for as long as the Trust needs me.”

Iain said: “I have enjoyed my time working at the Trust. There are a lot of dedicated, hardworking staff and it has been a privilege working with them.

“The Trust has had many challenges and still has a number to face. It is clear to me that there is a strong commitment to move on and deliver care and a good experience for our patients as we move into a new phase.

“We now have a substantive executive team in place. They are dedicated and experienced people who will lead the Trust in the months and years ahead.

“I am confident that, with the addition of Karen, I am leaving the Trust in good hands.”

Karen officially starts in her new role on Monday 17th April.

Healthwatch Sefton publish Annual Report 2015/2016:

Healthwatch Sefton have published their 2015/16 Annual Report.

The report details the impact and activities over the past year to place patients and the public at the heart of health and social care service improvement. It includes case studies, updates and information about our journey and achievements.

Click here to download a copy of the Annual Report.

Better Care in my Hands: Care Quality Commission’s Report into People’s Involvement in their Care

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and social care services in England. We make sure that hospitals, care homes, dental and GP surgeries and other care services in England provide people with safe, effective, compassionate and high-quality care, and we encourage them to make improvements.

CQC is publishing a report into the extent and quality of people’s involvement in their health and social care, based on new analysis of CQC’s national reports and inspection findings and on national patient surveys.

People’s right to being involved in their own care is enshrined in law in the fundamental standards of care. It is an essential part of person-centred care and leads to better and often more cost effective outcomes. This is particularly true for those with long term conditions or people who need to use services more intensively. The NHS Five Year Forward View and the Care Act place renewed focus on improving this area of care and CQC can take enforcement action against providers of care services that fail to meet this standard. This report is timely because as health and social care services reconfigure to adapt to the changing needs of their populations there is an opportunity to make sure person centred care becomes a reality for more people. The report identifies what enables people’s involvement in their own care and provides examples of good practice identified by CQC inspectors. CQC will use the findings from this report to strengthen our regulation and reporting of people’s involvement in their care.

Our key findings are:

Recent national patient survey data shows that just over half of those surveyed report feeling definitely involved in decisions about their health care and treatment, and this includes people’s responses for care in hospitals and in the community.

Women who use maternity services are particularly positive about how well they are involved in decisions about their care.We found examples of good practice of people’s involvement in their care in our inspections over the last year. However, there has been little change in people’s perceptions of how well they are involved in their health or social care over the last five years. A significant minority of people have consistently reported only feeling involved in their care to some extent or not at all over this period.

CQC’s national reports and thematic reviews from the last five years consistently show that some groups of people are less involved in their care than others. This is confirmed by new analysis of patient surveys. They are:

– Adults and young people with long term physical and mental health conditions.
– People with a learning disability.
– People over 75 years old.

We have also reported a lack of progress over the last six years in involving people in their care when they are detained under the Mental Health Act. Poor involvement in care is the biggest issue we found in monitoring the use of the Mental Health Act in 2014/15.

There are common problems in health and social care services, which can create a vicious circle of poor involvement particularly for those using different services or using services over a long period of time. These include:

– Failure to assess and monitor people’s capacity to make decisions about their care and to provide advocacy support
– Limited understanding , recording and monitoring of people’s wishes and preferences
– Inadequate family and carer involvement
– Lack of information and explanation of care and support options

 

Breathe Easy group supports Self-Care Week!

South Sefton patients who have set up a new support group for residents with breathing illnesses are inviting people to come along to an event they are holding during Self Care Week (16-22 November) to find out about how they can better manage their own wellbeing. 

On Wednesday 18 November Breathe Easy South Sefton is held a coffee day in the Strand By Me shop in Bootle Strand, where residents can find out more about the group and the range of support available locally for people with breathing conditions. 

After attending a respiratory and self-management training course organised by NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Sefton Council for Voluntary Services (CVS), the patients decided to launch their new Breathe Easy group. The group launched in June 2015 and they come together once a month with local residents in south Sefton to share their knowledge.

As well as being part of Self Care Week, the group’s event on Wednesday also marks World Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) day. Group members will be on hand to discuss self-management of respiratory conditions and they will be joined by NHS stop smoking services, offering advice on how to quit. 

Mick Maher, chair of the Breathe Easy group, said: “I wanted to go on the self-management course originally as I was diagnosed with a lung condition myself and had no idea what it was or how to deal with it. Then I thought, along with others on the course, that people in the community would really benefit from having that knowledge whether it’s for them or for someone they know, so we set up the group and decided to put an event on during Self Care Week.” 

Jenny Kristiansen, respiratory lead at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), explains: “Our six week course was launched back in January this year as patients were telling us they’d like more support to help them better manage conditions like COPD or asthma. It is proving really popular with patients and the fact that this course has led to the Breathe Easy group being established in south Sefton is fantastic – I can’t recommend their events highly enough and think the day at Strand By Me will be really beneficial to those with similar conditions.” 

The Breathe Easy group meets monthly in south Sefton and organises talks from a wide range of other local services, like Healthwatch Sefton giving patients the chance to hear about the support available to them in the area. 

One person out of seven in the UK is affected by a lung condition and the British Lung Foundation, Breathe Easy group, NHS South Sefton CCG and Sefton CVS want those people to know support is available for every one of them.  

This year the theme for Self Care Week is ‘Self Care for Life’ and the aim is to raise awareness of how to support people to be healthy throughout their life. Whether it is about preventing ill health by choosing healthy options that will impact positively on their physical health and mental wellbeing, taking care of their own minor ailments at home or understanding how to manage more serious conditions. For more information please click here.

For more information on ‘Breathe Easy Sefton South’ or to become a member, please visit: https://www.blf.org.uk/BreatheEasy/Detail/Sefton-South