Summer Holidays don’t have to spell Unhealthy Habits

2018 Joint CCG Logo

The school summer holidays are a chance to relax, sleep in, and enjoy a break from homework, but it’s best to maintain some routines to stay healthy and avoid a ‘shock to the system’ come September.

Debbie Fagan, chief nurse at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “Routines such as regular bedtimes and mealtimes are important for keeping your children on the right learning path.

“Studies show that memory, learning, attention, mood, behaviour and physical health are all improved through sleep.”

Here are some top tips for healthy eating and drinking during the summer holidays:

There’s room for occasional treats during the holidays but it can get expensive to keep buying a round of ice creams for the whole family – try to plan ahead and take some healthier snacks with you on a day out.

Change 4 Life have some great ideas for healthier lunchbox and picnic swaps that are easy to prepare and fun for the whole family: www.nhs.uk/change4life/recipes/healthier-lunchboxes.

It can be difficult to keep food cool on hot days, so follow this advice from NHS Choices on how to prepare and cook food safely, including on barbeques: www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/how-to-prepare-and-cook-food-safely.

Try to limit your intake of sugary drinks – even fruit juices contain sugar. Water is the healthiest option and the best for rehydration on a hot day. You can make the drinks more appealing to kids by adding novelty ice cubes or chopped fruit and cucumber.

Debbie added: “Eating healthily, regular exercise and good sleep all go hand-in-hand and will make the summer holidays more enjoyable and stress-free for the whole family.”

Public Invited to Governing Body Meetings

Members of the public who’re interested in learning more about health commissioning across Sefton can attend the latest governing body meetings.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are holding their next meetings in July, with doctors, nurses and other health professionals discussing the performance of local health services, such as hospitals and community care.

NHS Southport and Formby CCG will hold its meeting on Wednesday 4 July with NHS South Sefton CCG’s meeting taking place the following day on Thursday 5 July.

Dr Craig Gillespie, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG interim chair, said: “For the governing body it’s important that the public are always part of the decisions we make, this is why it’s great to see local people in attendance.

Dr Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “I’d welcome members of the public who wants to know more about health services in our area to come and hear the discussions that take place.”

A local GP is returning to the NHS Southport and Formby CCG governing body for her meeting as the new clinical lead for planned care.  Formby GP Dr Emily Ball has lived in the town since 2004, after growing up in Crosby and training in Nottingham.

NHS Southport and Formby CCG meeting will take place on Wednesday 4 July at the Family Life Centre, Ash St, Southport at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

NHS South Sefton CCG meeting will take place on Thursday 5 July at Merton House, Stanley Road in Bootle at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

Attendees may also be able to ask questions before the meeting formally starts.   To confirm attendance or for more information please call 0151 317 8456

NHS Commissioners ‘Proud’ to have been Shortlisted in Prestigious National Awards

NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS South Sefton CCG say they’re proud to have been finalists in the prestigious HSJ Value Awards 2018, recognising the best efficiency and improvement across the NHS.

Together, the CCGs were awarded the title of highly commended in the communications category for their work associated with communicating their Repeat Prescription Ordering Scheme (RPOS) at the national ceremony in Manchester.

RPOS was designed to significantly improve medicines safety for some of the borough’s most vulnerable residents, by reducing the amount of wasted and unused drugs stored, without supervision, in their homes. At the same time, the scheme aimed to reduce the high cost of these wasted medicines, achieving at least £500,000 savings in its first year of operation.

The CCGs worked one-to-one with vulnerable patients, created short videos and also toured Sefton to help explain the scheme by explaining the risks caused by stockpiling drugs at home, and helping patients to have medications reviewed regularly to fit their needs.

Susanne Lynch, head of medicines management at the CCGs, said: “It was a real honour to be at the awards ceremony and to be judged the only highly commended scheme in the communications category. We’re really proud of the work we have done to be shortlisted.

“We identified early that close collaboration with our communications and engagement team would be central to the success of RPOS.”

Lyn Cooke, head of communications and engagement at the CCGs, added: “It was essential for the communications and engagement team to be involved from the inception of the pilot and its initial design, through to its evaluation and wider roll out to the rest of Sefton.

“Through working closely with the medicines management team, we maximised on their expertise as pharmacists and pharmacy technicians to speak to people about their medicines and to ensure that the repeat prescription ordering scheme would work for them.

“To be shortlisted in the HSJ awards has been a real honour and recognition for all the hard work carried out by our colleagues in medicines management supported by our communications and engagement team.”

Alastair McLellan, Editor, HSJ, said “In July the prime minister has promised to reveal a historic funding settlement for the NHS. However, this welcome and long overdue boost will not remove the need for the NHS to deliver high quality healthcare which is also value for the money spent on it. Indeed, the extra money is likely to come with even greater scrutiny on NHS efficiency.

“The finalists and winning entrants of the HSJ Value Awards all demonstrate that the NHS is constantly seeking ways in which to enhance both the quality of care while making every penny count.”

NHS Southport and Formby CCG and NHS South Sefton CCG were one of nine organisations shortlisted in the communications category of the HSJ Value Awards 2018, with local specialist mental health, addiction, learning disability and community health services provider Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust.

‘Examine Your Options’ this Bank Holiday

Local health commissioners are encouraging Sefton residents to examine their options if they become unwell over the bank holiday weekend.

Anyone who thinks they may need to access health services over the bank holiday is being urged to check opening times for walk in centres, GP practices and chemists and also think about ordering any repeat prescriptions they need before the long weekend begins.

Dr Craig Gillespie, local GP and acting chair of NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), said: “The bank holiday weekend can be a good opportunity to relax and unwind but it’s important people know how to access health services, should they need to. Many GP practices will be closed on the bank holiday, so it’s particularly important for people to examine their options if they become poorly.”

Dr Rob Caudwell, a Southport GP and chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “There are a variety of services on offer to people such as the advice on the NHS choices website, and the NHS 111 telephone number. Pharmacists are also available to provide free, confidential advice about common health problems such as coughs, colds and sore throats.”

The local NHS in Sefton is also reminding people that A&E and 999 services are for life-threatening and serious conditions.

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the region there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

 Pharmacy Services

Many pharmacies will be open throughout the bank holiday weekend and the best way to find out which pharmacy is open and when is to visit our ‘Your Services Health page’.

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can also help you to self-care and prepare for many common illnesses and offer advice on which medicines to keep in stock at home.

In Sefton – whilst all pharmacies provide advice and treatment for a range of minor illnesses and ailments, a number in Sefton offer Care at the Chemist, which ensures our most vulnerable patients who don’t routinely pay for their prescriptions have free and easy access to over the counter medicines they may need without the need to see a doctor.

 NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies in your local area by visiting www.nhs.uk. This useful website also includes a handy symptom checker.

 NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

 Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

 GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

 Walk-in centres

Litherland Walk in Centre is open 8am – 8pm every day. in Litherland Town Hall, Hatton Hill Rd, L21 9JN. Call 0151 475 4667.

No matter where you live in Sefton you can simply drop in – there is no need for an appointment and all ages can get treatment here. The service treats minor illnesses and injuries that do not need a visit to accident and emergency (A&E). Remember A&E is for serious and life threatening illnesses or injuries.

West Lancashire Health Centre – 8am to 8pm, 7 days a week 

Skelmersdale Walk-in Centre – 8am to 8pm, 7 days a week

 Patient Access

Manage your repeat prescriptions and make GP appointments from the comfort of your own home, without having to venture outside, by using the new FREE Patient Access website and smartphone app. Simply search for ‘Patient Access’ in the app store.

Remember though, if using Patient Access for the very first time, you will first have to contact your GP practice so that you can register to use the app.

For information about services that can help in south Sefton over the bank holiday please visit our ‘Your Services Health page’.

Sefton CVS recognised for contribution to the NHS

Sefton Council for Voluntary Service (CVS) has been awarded the NHS 70 community partner of the year award, as voted for by staff of NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG.

Sefton Health Commissioners Celebrate Nurses’ Day 2018

Choosing nursing as a career offers a world of opportunities and experiences that many people wouldn’t associate with the profession. That is the message from Sefton health commissioners ahead of International Nurses’ Day 2018 which celebrates the work of nurses in dedicating themselves to caring for others.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are marking International Nurses’ Day 2018 by highlighting the work of their quality team which is led by the CCGs chief nurse, Debbie Fagan. The quality team is made up of qualified nurses who have since moved into commissioning and together they are responsible for ensuring that health services in Sefton are safe for the people who use them.

A relatively new member of the team is Karen Garside, who is the CCGs designated nurse for safeguarding children. Speaking about Nurses’ Day 2018, and the experiences she has had in her career, Karen said: “I’ve been a nurse for over 27 years and I really value the fact that my work makes a difference to young people all over Sefton.

“I’ve done a variety of different roles including working in a hospital, working as a health visitor and then with children, young people and their families. It was when I was a health visitor that I realised how I could make a difference for children who were at risk of harm or abuse. I worked in a mixture of deprived and affluent areas and safeguarding was a key part of this work, supporting families and working with partners to ensure children and young people were safe from harm, including physical, sexual, emotional harm and neglect.

“Although I no longer have direct contact with children and young people at an operational level, I enjoy the fact that I can still make a difference through working at a strategic level in partnership with different agencies to ensure we have the overarching systems and processes in place continue to meet their needs and ensure they are protected from harm.

“My workload is very varied and can include supporting a serious case review, checking the quality of a local health service and developing policies to tackle issues such as child exploitation. In between formal meetings, advice and support may also be required for individual cases, therefore it is very unpredictable.”

The theme of Nurses’ Day 2018 is #ThisNurse. You can find out more about Nurses’ Day, including information about the range of career options for qualified nurses, by visiting the Royal College of Nursing website: https://www.rcn.org.uk/nurses-day

You can watch an interview with Karen talking about her job here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XibIyJMT7mM

Early Identification Key to Sepsis Treatment

Everyone has a role to play in identifying and treating sepsis in its early stages. That is the message from local health commissioners who are backing a campaign to raise awareness of the illness.

Sepsis is a potentially life threatening condition which can lead to multiple organ failure and death if not identified and treated early. It is estimated that around 150,000 people a year in the UK are diagnosed with sepsis which can be treated with antibiotics if identified in its early stages.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are backing a campaign by Health Education England titled ‘Think Sepsis’ which is raising awareness of the illness. Local health commissioners are highlighting a different element of sepsis diagnosis and treatment every month between now and world sepsis day on September 13.

This month, the Sefton CCGs have focussed on medicines management and the role community pharmacists can play in offering support to anyone who may have concerns about the illness.

Speaking about the campaign, Susanne Lynch, head of medicines management at the CCGs, said: “Everyone has a role to play in identifying and treating sepsis, including community pharmacists. Although it would be very rare for someone to present themselves at a chemists with signs of sepsis, we need everyone to be vigilant and ensure they familiarise themselves with the symptoms and are able to respond accordingly.

“Official guidelines state that, within an hour of diagnosis of sepsis, broad-spectrum antibiotics should be administered, so getting people to hospital quickly is of paramount importance.”

People are advised to seek medical advice urgently if you’ve recently had an infection or injury and you have had possible early signs of sepsis. People should be aware of the following symptoms which may indicate a person has sepsis.

In children under five, you should go straight to A&E or call 999 if your child has any of these symptoms:

  • looks mottled, bluish or pale
  • is very lethargic or difficult to wake
  • feels abnormally cold to touch
  • is breathing very fast
  • has a rash that does not fade when you press it
  • has a fit or convulsion

In older children and adults, early symptoms of sepsis may include:

  • a high temperature (fever) or low body temperature
  • chills and shivering
  • a fast heartbeat
  • fast breathing

Anyone who would like to know more about sepsis, including further information on what symptoms to keep an eye out for, can visit the NHS Choices website: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/sepsis/treatment/

Sefton Health Commissioners recognised for Improving Patient Safety

NHS commissioners in Sefton have been shortlisted for a national award after setting up an innovative programme which aims to reduce the number of people being readmitted to hospital.

The medicines management team at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (SSCCG) has been shortlisted for the ‘Improving Safety in Medicines Management’ category at the prestigious HSJ Patient Safety Awards 2018. This is the second national award that the team have been shortlisted for in a month after being shortlisted for the HSJ Value Awards last month.

Approximately one-fifth of hospital readmissions are related to medication and up to half of these may be preventable. In order to address this, SSCCG and the Aintree University Hospital pharmacy team set up a service to review patient medicines in their own home, once they had been discharged from hospital.

The project used a pharmacist and pharmacy technician in SSCCGs medicines management team to undertake the review and advise patients in regard to lifestyle advice, their medical condition and disease management.

The results of the programme were very promising with an initial evaluation showing that 81% of patients reported that they were more likely to take their medicines correctly, as prescribed.

The winners of the HSJ Patient Safety Awards will be announced on 9 July at a ceremony in Manchester.

Speaking about the shortlisting, Susanne Lynch, head of medicines management at NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “This scheme was just one part of our innovative, system wide approach to medicines which has allowed us to deliver significant improvements to safety and patient care.”

Dave Thornton, Assistant Clinical Director of Pharmacy at Aintree University Hospital, said: “Being shortlisted for this award recognises the importance of the link between hospital and community care when it comes to ensuring medicines are used safely and effectively and the benefits that can be realised from a joint approach.”

The NHS South Sefton CCG website contains information about where you can find help and advice about your health. Visit http://www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/your-health-and-services/ for more information.

Sefton Health Experts offer Five Tips to help you avoid the Flu

Leading health figures from Sefton Council, NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have joined together to offer expert advice to residents on how they can best avoid catching the flu this winter.

Cllr Ian Moncur, Sefton Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing said: “Flu can have really serious effects for many vulnerable people including the elderly, young children, pregnant women and those living with long term health conditions.

“For this reason the following advice also includes tips that will help residents to limit the spread of flu within their community and I strongly urge everybody to take the advice on board.”

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “People with chronic long term health conditions or reduced immunity should get vaccinated even if they have no symptoms. A bout of flu can greatly worsen any existing condition and increases the risk of complications like pneumonia.”

Dr Andy Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG added: “A flu vaccination is an important part of staying well over winter. If you have any questions about getting vaccinated, simply contact your GP practice and ask for advice, we’ll be happy to help.”

  1. Get the flu jab
    The best way to protect yourself and others from flu is by getting the flu vaccination. The vaccination is free for those aged over 65, pregnant women, people living with long term health conditions, young children aged 2 and 3 and to registered carers.If you’re not eligible for a free vaccination you can purchase it for as little as £10. Speak to your local pharmacist for find out more about this service.
  2. Know the symptoms
    It’s important to be aware of the symptoms of flu in order to help you to best treat its effects and avoid passing the illness on to others.Symptoms include a sudden fever, aching body, feeling tired or exhausted, chesty cough, sore throat, headache, difficulty sleeping, loss of appetite, diarrhoea or tummy pain, nausea and being sick.
  3. Get the right advice
    If you think you may have the flu try to avoid visiting your GP or pharmacist to reduce the risk of spreading the illness. Instead call the free NHS helpline service 111 or visit the NHS Choices website.Be sure stock up on flu and cold remedies in advance so that if you become ill you have everything you need at home. Remember that antibiotics should not be used to treat flu and should only be used upon the advice of your GP.
  4. Wash your hands
    Washing your hands regularly using soap and warm water will help you to prevent the spread of germs that can cause flu. By washing your hands you will destroy bugs that you may have picked up from touching surfaces used by other people, such as light switches and door handles.Not only will this reduce the chances of you catching the flu yourself, but it will also help to limit the spread of flu across Sefton.
  5. Be mindful of others
    Try to avoid having unnecessary contact with other people if you or they have symptoms of flu.If you think you have symptoms of flu be mindful of the people around you. Catch coughs or sneezes in tissues and bin them immediately. Try to reschedule plans with friends or family to when you’re feeling better.Remember that while many people can recover from flu themselves within about a week, it can become extremely serious for more vulnerable residents.

 

 

To find out more about flu and the flu vaccination visit the NHS Choices website: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/flu/

Have your say about the review of Sefton health policies

People in Sefton are being asked for their views about a range of local health policies that are being updated to reflect the latest medical evidence.

The two NHS bodies responsible for the shaping and buying of health services in Sefton is reviewing more than 100 policies to ensure that resources are used on the treatments which work best for local people.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are working together with their counterparts in Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, St Helens and Warrington CCGs on a project called ‘Reviewing local health policies’ to agree a number of clinical procedures based on certain criteria.

The review aims to ensure that patients receive the appropriate healthcare in the right place at the right time, that treatments with no or very little evidence of effectiveness are not used and procedures are carried out for maximum clinical or functional benefit, not for cosmetic of psychological reasons.  Clinicians will explore other, more suitable treatments for patients with these types of needs.

Another advantage is to ensure services are up to date with the latest national guidelines, methods and technology, whilst also offering value for money.  Where possible, another aim is to try and standardise the policies and treatments available across the seven CCG areas.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “The quality of care given to patients is the most important factor in developing these policies and by working together in this review we can make sure that NHS resources are being spent in the best way on the most effective treatments and procedures.”

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, added: “We are reviewing these polices against the latest medical evidence, advice and treatments, so we can be sure we get the best care and outcomes for our patients.

“Patients who might not be eligible for treatment will still be able to apply through an individual funding request (IFR) where appropriate.”

Treatments being reviewed over the next few months in this first phase of the programme include removal of piles, cataract surgery, laser tattoo removal and treatments for hairloss.

You can view all of the policies being reviewed and find out how to have your say on each Sefton CCG’s website www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk or www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk  – until the 18th September 2017.

Sefton and Liverpool CCGs pause their plan to merge

Clinical commissioning groups in Sefton and Liverpool are pausing their plan to merge the three organisations.

NHS South Sefton CCG, NHS Southport and Formby CCG and NHS Liverpool CCG have made the decision so they can spend more time considering the implications of a merger for their patients, staff and partners.

Governing body members agreed the pause at a joint meeting on 6 June 2017 and their decision will now be recommended for approval at their next governing body meetings.

The three CCGs were required by NHS England to submit their formal merger application by July 2017, ahead of any agreed organisational change from April 2018. Governing body members have instead agreed to delay submitting their application and revisit their proposal in a year’s time. Importantly, this step takes account of the increasing challenges and demands placed on the NHS as a whole and, in particular at this time, by the three local health commissioners.

At the tri-governing body meeting, members agreed that the original July 2017 application deadline would divert the CCGs’ efforts away from their priority work over the coming year – a crucial period for each CCG.

So, this additional time created by a pause will allow the CCGs to concentrate their efforts in two areas. Firstly, in ensuring the CCGs continued focus is on improving financial and health service performance for the distinct populations they serve in line with their individual statutory duties, whilst secondly, developing a more considered and robust business case that clearly demonstrates the benefits of merging to their GP practice members, local residents and other key partners.

Membership of the North Mersey Local Delivery System (LDS) means the CCGs will continue to work together on system wide programmes that benefit and affect the populations they serve. Good progress and pace has already been made, without the upheaval that organisational or structural change would bring to the CCGs at this present time.

Current areas of joint work include work to transform hospital services. Other areas for future closer collaboration will now be explored and could include RightCare benchmarking, continuing healthcare and funded nursing care.

You can find out more about the CCGs from their websites:

www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk or www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk and www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Strand By Me – A new Place of Welcome opens in Bootle

A new Place of Welcome has opened in the Strand Shopping Centre in Bootle last week in the Strand by Me Centre which is a joint initiative by Sefton CVS, Sefton Council, South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group and the Strand Centre. It offers an open approach to people shopping in the Centre and is also staffed by volunteers from the Strand House Residents Association and others.

Conal Devitt the centre lead commented, ‘We are really pleased to offer a Place of Welcome to people in our Centre whoever they are or wherever they have come from. This, we believe is a unique partnership offering a wide range of services including developing hospitality and bringing people’s skills together.’

Pictured above are John Davis (second from left) with friends and visitors at the opening of the Place of Welcome which will be open to all comers on Tuesdays at 10am until 12 noon for refreshments. Places of Welcome harness people’s gifts and energies over a cup of tea and a biscuit and a warm welcome. Pop along anytime.

Strand By Me is located on the ground floor of Bootle Strand Shopping Centre opposite Wilko, for more information click here!

Places of Welcome is a network of small community organisations, including faith communities, who offer an unconditional welcome to local people for at least a few hours a week.

The primary aim of the Places of Welcome network is that “Every neighbourhood has places where all people feel safe to belong, connect and contribute.”

If your church or community organisation would like to give it a try or would like more information contact our team or go to http://www.placesofwelcome.org/

Click here for contact information of locations around the UK.

Sefton: John Davis at john.davis@togetherliverpool.org.uk

Twitter: @PlacesOfWelcome

Facebook: @placesofwelcome

 

All Sefton GP practices sign up to successful scheme

All GP practices in Sefton have now signed up to a repeat prescription ordering scheme following its success in several GP practices.

The change in the way repeat prescriptions are ordered not only improves patient’s safety but also helps to reduce the amount of wasted medicines, estimated at costing the local NHS at least £2 million each year.

NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS South Sefton CCG introduced the scheme which means that pharmacies can no longer order repeat prescriptions on behalf of patients. For the new GP practices on board this will begin from 11 July 2017.

Susanne Lynch, head of medicines management for both CCGs, said: “We initially piloted the scheme in 19 practices in September 2016 and as well as benefiting patients it saved £220,000 in 3 months.

“A further 13 GP practices joined the scheme in March this year and we’re really happy that all of our practices are now signed up as this will help us to safely monitor repeat prescriptions for those patients. It will also ensure their repeat medications remain appropriate for their individual medical needs, which often change over time.

“It is important to note for the new practices coming on board next month that the scheme does not affect anyone who already orders their own repeat prescriptions directly from their GP practice, and whilst the new system may be inconvenient for some, it does address some very real medicines safety issues as well as safeguarding precious NHS funds.”

Whilst GP practices will put special arrangements in place for those patients who would struggle to order their own repeat prescriptions directly from their GP practice, the roll out across all 49 GP practices means it will now affect just under 50% out of a total of almost 280,000 people registered at practices in Sefton.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG and Southport GP, said: “We know that the previous system often led to patients receiving medications they did not require, yet because their pharmacy ordered their repeats for them, people continued to receive excess, which was a real safety issue.”

So, as well as introducing safer prescribing systems, the scheme will also save money, enabling more vital NHS funds to be spent on priority healthcare benefiting a greater number of Sefton residents.

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “We know our NHS services are operating in difficult financial times, so anything that can save resources whilst importantly improving patient safety at the same time has to be welcomed and I’d encourage residents who may experience some initial inconvenience to consider the overwhelming safety and cost benefits of this scheme.

“This is about patients, carers, practices and pharmacies working together to achieve the safest and most cost effective prescribing systems that benefit us all.

“If you are experiencing any difficulties don’t be afraid to speak to your practice or the Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) to resolve any issues.”

The newest GP practices to join the scheme are:

  • Christiana Hartley Medical Practice
  • Churchtown Medical Centre
  • Lincoln House
  • Norwood Surgery
  • Roe Lane Surgery
  • St Marks Medical Centre
  • Eastview Surgery
  • Kingsway Surgery
  • Aintree Road Medical Centre
  • Maghull Family Surgery
  • Maghull Health Centre
  • Ford Medical Practice
  • Concept House Surgery
  • Drs Misra, Bird and Kassha Surgery
  • Maghull Practice
  • Litherland Practice
  • Seaforth Village Surgery

Patients new to the scheme will be invited to give their views and experiences as part of the evaluation of the system.

Anyone wanting to give their views about the scheme can complete a short survey, which can be found on each CCG’s website, along with more information and videos about the project by clicking here.

Those patients affected by the scheme have been sent a letter and a leaflet from their practice and the two CCGs, giving them full details of how the scheme works and what it means for them. Anyone who has queries or who wants to know more can contact the PALS team on 0800 218 2333 or email MLCSU.PALS@nhs.net

Health commissioners support Diabetes Week

Health commissioners in Sefton are supporting national Diabetes Week 2017 (11 June – 17 June) by raising awareness of how living a healthier lifestyle can help prevent the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

In south Sefton the estimated number of people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes is 7,616 (6.02 per cent of the population) and in Southport and Formby, 6,338 (6.14 per cent of the population) but evidence exists which shows that many cases of Type 2 diabetes are preventable. People can greatly reduce their risk of developing the condition by eating a healthy diet, exercise and maintaining a healthy weight.

Every year, Type 2 diabetes costs the NHS £8.8 billion, which equates to almost 9% of its budget and causes 22,000 early deaths per year and there are currently 5 million people in England at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.If current trends persist, one in three people will be obese by 2034 and one in ten will develop Type 2 diabetes.

To minimise the risk of people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes each year, NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are referring those people who are picked up as at risk from a blood test to a new prevention programme.

So far, 665 Sefton residents at greatest risk of developing diabetes have been referred by their doctor to the Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) over the last six months. Wave 1 launched in 2016 and in the first year aims to offer up to 20,000 places nationwide to people in the ‘high risk’ category. The NHS DPP will roll out to the whole country by 2020.

Those referred on to the programme get tailored, personalised help to reduce their risk of Type 2 diabetes, including education on healthy eating and lifestyle, help to lose weight and bespoke physical exercise programmes. An estimated 65 per cent of those patients who have completed the programme across England have lost weight.

Roy, age 68, from Bootle was directed to Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) after receiving a letter from his GP. He wanted to attend to try and reduce his risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Roy found the diet, exercise and healthy living advice most useful, he said: “I learned to avoid the biscuit tin and head for the fruit bowl instead. I am also drinking more water and avoiding sugary drinks. I’ve lost about half a stone so far and I plan to continue with it as I’m so pleased with the results.”

The programme is commissioned by NHS England, in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) and Diabetes UK and the CCGs in Sefton are part of the first roll out of the programme. In Sefton it is being delivered by Living Well, Taking Control.

Dr Nigel Taylor, diabetes lead at NHS South Sefton CCG said: “We are proud to be involved in the first wave of the programme. The way it works is that people are contacted and offered a referral to the programme if their health check or a blood test taken over the last nine months flags up that they are at risk of being diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes.”

Dr Doug Callow, diabetes lead at NHS Southport and Formby CCG said: “If you do receive a letter to attend the National Health Check we would urge you to take it up. If you are then referred to the programme it is just a 90 minute session for seven weeks. Once you’ve completed the programme you will receive ongoing support for 12 months and information on local activities to join if you wish.”

You can view some videos of several Sefton patients sharing their stories of the programme on the CCGs YouTube page or on their twitter account throughout the week: @NHSSSCCG

For an overview of the Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP), please visit https://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/qual-clin-lead/diabetes-prevention/

To find out more about the NHS DPP being delivered by Living Well Taking Control in south Sefton, Southport and Formby see www.lwtcsupport.co.uk

The theme for Diabetes Week this year is: Know Diabetes. Fight Diabetes. While a lot of people have a good understanding of diabetes and how to manage it, many others aren’t getting the right help and support to look after their diabetes.

For more information on how to get involved please visit: https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Get_involved/Diabetes-Week/

ANFIELD LEGEND OPENS SEFTON’S NEW STAR CENTRE

Liverpool legend Jamie Carragher was the VIP guest this week when a Bootle-based charity launched its new positive mental health service for children and young people across Sefton.

Staff at Venus invited the retired Liverpool and England defender to officially open the new Star Centre, based in the renovated former Orrell Arts Centre building on Linacre Lane.

Around 100 guests attended the opening ceremony, including representatives of organisations that have helped to fund the project, and partner agencies in the new service.

The Star Centre building has been refurbished with the support of the Tudor Trust, the Clothworkers Foundation, One Stop and the Steve Morgan Foundation.

The main funding for the centre’s core services has come from NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group and NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group, with additional support from the John Moores Foundation and Jamie Carragher’s own 23 Foundation.

The partners in the services include Sefton Council Well Young Person’s Team, Sefton Emotional Achievement Service, the ADHD Foundation, Alder Hey CAMHS and Mersey Care.

Venus is a well-established organisation providing a wide range of support services for children, young people, women, parents and families.

The charity has created the new centre to provide a friendly and welcoming space where young people up to the age of 18 can access information and advice on mental health issues, as well as group support and a variety of therapies.

Services on offer will include counselling, CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), psychoeducation, peer support, family therapy, training for parents and group activities addressing issues such as the transition from children’s to adults’ services.

starcentre2.jpg

Venus Family Support Manager, Georgina Harvey, explained: “The key features of the Star Centre’s approach will be its friendliness and its informality.

“Young people will be able to self refer, and simply drop in for advice, guidance, signposting and referral to other sources of support. It will be a place they can go for someone to talk to, and a place they can walk into and ask for help.”

Peter Wong, Children Young People and Maternity Commissioning Manager for the two CCGs, added: “Making services more accessible is something that young people have told us loudly and clearly.

“We also know that we need to support services to work more closely together in meeting the emotional health and wellbeing needs of our local children and young people.

“We are pleased that we can support the Star Centre in taking forward both of these key aims, and we are proud of what the new centre will offer young people in Sefton,” added Mr Wong.

Georgina Harvey also thanked Jamie Carragher for taking time out to perform the official opening, saying his presence would help to raise the profile of the new centre across the borough.

Jamie – who grew up in Bootle’s Marsh Lane area – congratulated Venus and its partners in the Star Centre initiative, saying it would provide a much-needed new source of support for vulnerable children and young people from throughout Sefton.

The Star Centre is based within the former Orrell Arts Centre/Orrell Library building on Linacre Lane, Bootle L20 6ES.

It will be open to young people Monday to Friday from 3.30-7.30pm and on Saturdays from 1pm-4pm, with a parents/carers drop-in session earlier in the day from 10am-1pm.

For more information about the Star Centre contact Venus on 0151 474 4744.