Opportunity to become a Public Governor

North West Boroughs Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust is looking to recruit Public Governors to its Council of Governors.

A public governor is elected by the members in the constituency they are standing to be a governor within. Each of the trust’s public governors is appointed for a period of up to three years.

The public constituency is drawn from seven areas. These are made up of six boroughs where the trust delivers its services (Halton, Knowsley, St Helens, Warrington, Wigan and Sefton), plus the seventh constituency called ‘other’, which represents areas outside of these six boroughs.

The number of governor seats in each borough is currently based on population size. Staff and appointed members from the trust’s partner organisations also form an important part of the Council of Governors.

How do I become a public governor?
The Trust welcomes nominations from people of any age (16 and over), race or ethnicity, religion or belief, sexual orientation, gender, disability and those with caring responsibilities.

Please note that in order to be elected to our Council of Governors you will need to live in the constituency where you would like to be nominated.

The nomination period is open until 18 January 2018 and forms can be downloaded from the trust’s website:
http://www.nwbh.nhs.uk/council-of-governors-elections

Merseyside PCC urges Government to listen to public concerns on police cuts

Politicians across the North West of England have come together to call on the Government to reverse years of policing austerity in tomorrow’s Queen’s Speech.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester joined Police and Crime Commissioners for Merseyside, Lancashire and Cheshire in writing to the Home Secretary to ensure that the public’s concerns about police cuts are top of the Government’s agenda. Citing recent attacks and the erosion of neighbourhood policing that provides vital community intelligence they said,

“As Home Secretary you have the ultimate responsibility for ensuring that police forces across the country are properly resourced so they can keep people safe and tackle crime. We are asking that you ensure that this is a priority for the Government by making a clear commitment to reverse austerity in policing in this year’s Queen’s Speech.”

Across the four forces more than £385 million in savings have had to be found since 2010 with a further estimated £90m to be found by 2020. This has meant a reduction of more than 4,000 police officers and 1,500 fewer police staff across the region.

Merseyside’s Police Commissioner Jane Kennedy said: “I have lobbied central government for more funding for our police service for years. It is has now got to the point that Chief Constables and senior policing leaders can no longer stay silent and are speaking out.

“The need is real. It is time ministers listened.

“The thin blue line is stretched like never before and further cuts are damaging all frontline services. The government needs to stop these cuts and, instead, consider how to invest in the service which works so hard to keep us all safe, all of the time.”

Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, said: “We urgently need a wholesale review of police funding in the light of the changing times we are living in. Our police forces have absorbed the brunt of cuts as best they can since 2010, but more savings still need to be found and officer numbers are tumbling. As we see the terrorist threat at its highest ever level, and an increase in violent crime, our thin blue line has become dangerously overstretched.

“In Greater Manchester alone we have 2,000 fewer police officers patrolling our streets. This level of pressure cannot be sustained and, without a doubt, Greater Manchester Police needs more officers. Our Chief Constable Ian Hopkins has said that officer numbers are currently at the low end of reasonable, which to me means borderline unreasonable.

“The tragic events of recent months have highlighted just how important the police service is to the safety of our people, and this is an area that cannot simply be pruned back beyond recognition. But even prior to these terror attacks, policing was struggling to cope with the day-to-day demands placed on it. The Government must act now and reverse the cuts before our police service becomes unviable.”

Clive Grunshaw, Lancashire’s Police and Crime Commissioner said, “I hear from people and officers across Lancashire about their concerns about the resources available to the police to do their job and keep communities safe.

“The Government need to listen to these concerns and commit to reversing austerity in policing in the Queen’s Speech this week.

“Despite promises from Ministers around ‘protecting’ budgets Lancashire receives less money every year from the Government to deliver a policing service. My message to the Home Secretary is that this needs to change and we need to start re-investing in policing, not cutting our budgets further.”

In Merseyside, savings of £84 million have had to be found since 2010 with more than £18 million additional savings estimated to be needed by 2021/22. This has already meant a reduction of more than 1,000 officers in seven years.

To read the full letter Click here.

Third Sector Trends in the North West of England research report

Tony Chapman, honorary professor at the University of Durham, has produced a report in partnership with IPPR North regarding third sector trends across the North and the North West of England.

The statistics produced from the report showed that across the North West, 133,000 people are in full-time employment combined with 430,000 volunteers contributing 30 million hours (per annum), worth between £475m and £816m. The total GVA from these figures equates to £2.5bn.

Across the north as a whole, statistics showed that 233,000 people are in full-time employment combined with 930,000 volunteers contributing 66 million hours (per annum) with a total GVA of £5.4bn.

Number of full-time employees and volunteers working in the voluntary sector

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Source: Third Sector Trends in the North of England (IPPR North, 2017)

Not only does the data highlight the number of people involved within the sector; it also indicates the contribution from the North West to the region as a whole. These figures highlight the value and importance of the voluntary sector across the North not only at a fiscal level, but also in showing the amount of hours that volunteers invest over the year.

As the report concludes, one of the main strengths of the sector is its sheer size as a whole; as well as the strength of the positive relationships between organisations (both formal and informal), between TSOs and with the public and private sector; and the crucial role of volunteers in sustaining third sector activity.

It is because of these strengths that the sector continues to show great resilience and the capacity to adapt in the face of a stagnating economy, increasing demand, and the continuation of the government’s austerity agenda.

The full report is available here

VSNW and infrastructure partners in the North West have supported the research conducted by and thank groups who contributed towards the project.