Have your say on Sefton health policies review

Sefton residents are being asked for views about a number of local health policies, being reviewed to make sure NHS resources are used on the most effective treatments.

NHS South Sefton (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG are working together with Halton, Liverpool, St Helens and Warrington CCGs to review a group of policies for procedures and treatments that are known as Criteria Based Clinical Treatments (CBCT).  These are routine procedures that are known to have medical benefit only in very specific situations, or for a small number of people.

‘Working Together To Support Our Communities’ Workshops (Wednesday 3rd & 10th October)

Sefton CVS are working in partnership with Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust, Sefton Council and NHS South Sefton CCG & NHS Southport & Formby CCG to host two upcoming workshops looking at a community-based model of services in Sefton.

These workshops will give you and your organisation the opportunity to both hear in more detail about these ideas but also to shape the way you or your organisation wants to be involved.

Click here to download the event invitation 

Click here to download the booking form (Word / PDF

The two workshops planned in Sefton are:

Wednesday 3rd  October, 9.30am-2pm – Crosby Lakeside Adventure Centre (CLAC), Cambridge Road, Waterloo, Liverpool, L22 1RR (click here for map)

Wednesday 10th October, 9.30am-2pm – Waterside Lodge, Marine Drive, Southport, PR8 1RY  (click here for map)

BOOKING IS ESSENTIAL

To book your place, please complete and return the attached booking form to events@seftoncvs.org.uk or call 0151 920 0726. Alternatively, please return the booking form to the address below:

Freepost RTCG-HGXH-LHRS
Sefton Council For Voluntary Service
3rd Floor, North Wing, Suite 3b, Burlington House,
Crosby Road North,
LIVERPOOL,
L22 0LG

Please include details of any dietary or accessibility requirements. Bookings are available on a first come first served basis.

Job Vacancy: High Intensity User and Reablement Co-ordinator, Full-time (closing 5pm, Monday 17th September)

Sefton CVS in partnership with South Sefton CCG and Southport and Formby CCG will deliver a pilot project working directly with Sefton residents who are using urgent care services inappropriately.

Salary: £28,485
Location: Based at Sefton CVS Burlington House however the post is borough wide and will require some travel
Responsible to: Deputy Chief Executive, Sefton CVS

This role is fixed term for 18 months.

Job Purpose: 

The post holder will manage a team of ‘Outreach and Intervention Workers’ who will work with ‘high intensity users’ to reduce the number of emergency ambulance calls and unscheduled care interactions. The ‘Outreach and Intervention Workers’ will focus on positive behaviour change addressing those issues that are contributing to residents utilising care services inappropriately.

The post holder will also manage a team of ‘Reablement Health and Wellbeing Trainers’ working as part of the ‘Virtual Ward’..  The focus of reablement is on helping older people “to do for themselves” in their own home rather than “doing it for” them.  Reablement is about supporting adults to achieve maximum independence and regain the skills and confidence they may have lost as a result of poor health or as a consequence of having spent a period of time in hospital.

Downloads:
Job Description & Person Specification (Word / PDF)

Application Form (Word PDF)
Guidance Notes (Word / PDF)
Diversity Monitoring Form (Word / PDF)
Criminal Convictions Declaration (Word / PDF)

The closing date for completed applications is 5pm on Monday 17th September 2018.

Interviews are scheduled for Wednesday 26th and Thursday 27th September 2018. Please note: candidates must be available to attend interview. 

All completed applications and for any enquiries, please email recruitment@seftoncvs.org.uk.

Tips for looking after your health in Sefton this bank holiday

However you are planning to enjoy the long weekend, the local NHS has some useful information for how to take care of yourself in case of illness or injury.

Debbie Fagan, chief nurse for NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “Most minor illnesses and ailments can be effectively treated at home with a well stocked medicine cabinet at any time of year but remember to store things like painkillers and antihistamines safely and out of the reach of young children. Your local pharmacist will be happy to advise you about the over the counter preparations that can help.”

She added: “If you’re out and about over the bank holiday weekend, you could add a small first aid kit to your bag or the boot of the car, just in case. Drinking plenty of water and protecting yourself from the sun are also simple ways to take care of yourself.”

Although GP practices will not be open on Monday 27 August, some local pharmacies will be open if you do need help unexpectedly. Pharmacists can give advice and suggest treatments for a range of minor illnesses and injuries. With no appointment necessary, you can get back to enjoying your weekend rather than waiting to see a GP.

You can visit the CCG websites to see which pharmacies will be open this bank holiday:

You can also find details of other services that can help if you’re unwell, including walk in centres and NHS 111, which is available anytime and for free by calling 111 and also now available online at www.111.nhs.uk.

Sefton CVS’s Health & Wellbeing Trainer Social Impact Report

The Health and Wellbeing Trainers Team was first formed in 2013 as a pilot project and soon became established as a key part of the Sefton CVS’s Reablement Service. This brand new Social Impact Report details the work of the team across South Sefton.

Sefton GPs asked to keep things simple when seeking patient feedback

As part of the #ItStartsWithYou campaign, Healthwatch Sefton and the local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are calling on GP practices in Sefton, as the front line of the health service, to send a strong cultural signal to patients that the NHS is open and interested in listening to their views.

Healthwatch Sefton and the CCGs are also encouraging GPs and other primary care staff to share their own stories to tell them how patient feedback has helped them to learn and improve the way they provide care.

CCG VCF Report – Working Together for a Healthier Community

The achievements of community groups within Sefton have come under the spotlight with the launch of a new report.

The Working Together For A Healthier Community report showcases the work of organisations and groups in the voluntary, community and faith sector after receiving grants from the CCG VCF Fund.

Over more than three years, the two NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) in Sefton invested £2.5million into projects designed to improve the health and wellbeing of local communities.

Fiona Taylor, Chief Officer at NHS South Sefton CCG and NHS Southport and Formby CCG, says: “The main aim of the grants was to improve people’s sense of inclusion and involvement which, in turn, helps their health, wellbeing and independence.

“The grants, managed by Sefton CVS, have clearly highlighted the potential ‘reach’ of the funding – far beyond the direct beneficiaries – but deep into people’s families and communities.”

There were 52 different projects delivered throughout Sefton ranging from those looking to tackle childhood obesity, reduce social isolation for older people or help people improve their mental wellbeing.

More than 10,500 people engaged with the projects that delivered around 54,000 meals and more than 590 volunteers gave their time in supporting the projects.

Nigel Bellamy, Deputy Chief Executive of Sefton Council for Voluntary Service (CVS), explains: “As a result of this vital investment we can say that more children are now confident to face the challenges of growing up, more adults are positively equipped with skills to deal with managing their wellbeing and more older people can lead an independent life where they don’t have to feel alone.”

Please see the report here.

For more information about the report and the projects visit www.seftoncvs.org.uk

Bootle care home thanks local NHS

A Bootle care home has thanked its local clinical commissioning group (CCG) for its work to improve care for its residents.

Thanks to NHS South Sefton CCG’s Care Home Innovation Program (CHIP), residents at Afton Lodge are being admitted to hospital much less frequently for emergency treatment and care and are instead being cared for more comfortably in their home.

CHIP brings together a combination of elements including telehealth, improved training for care home staff, and more dedicated services to support participating homes.

Since its launch CHIP has achieved over 25% reduction in 999 calls in participating care homes and related ambulance conveyances through telehealth, community matron visits, standardisation of medical protocols, a bi-monthly quality improvement collaborative meeting and training for care home staff.

This has had an impact on many residents but Mary Searle found it massively improved the quality of her life.

Mary said: “I have really benefited from the telehealth programme and feel more comfortable speaking to doctors this way as it’s much easier to explain my symptoms. I have also stopped getting regular infections which I believe is down to being able to speak to professional doctors so easily.”

Jennifer Oldfield, joint manager at Afton Lodge, said: “We are really thankful for the CHIP programme and all it’s done for our residents. The health care assistant training has given our staff the skills and the confidence to know when a resident needs medical attention.”

Julie Dry, joint manager of Afton Lodge, said: “We have also received information and support on medicine management from the CCG allowing us to reduce the medicine waste in our care home. Our residents are also thankful for the benefits it has had on them.

We would also really like to thank Regency Healthcare who have been a constant support to all of us here at Afton Lodge.”

NHS South Sefton CCG’s CHIP team was recently recognised for its work on telehealth by the North West Coast Awards where they won the award for Best System Improvement award for its joined up approach.

NHS South Sefton CCG brings together 30 member GP practices covering an area from Bootle in the south, Hightown in the north and Maghull to the east.

 

For more information see: southseftonccg.org.uk or follow us on twitter @NHSSSCCG

Local NHS Services thanked for hard work during ‘cyber attack’

Staff at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have thanked clinical and IT staff for their hard work to make sure patient services were maintained without any disruption following the recent cyber attack.

IT staff worked hard to recover computers that were attacked by the virus and the general practices saw patients with appointments throughout the week. Those people who had appointments with community services were also reassured that community services had introduced a temporary system to make sure that patients could be seen as normal.

Services at Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust have now returned to normal following the cancellation of some planned services last week.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG, said: “Staff across the NHS in Sefton worked extremely hard to ensure that patient care was maintained and that no services were forced to close.

“Many staff literally worked round the clock the weekend it happened to ensure that any service disruption was kept to a minimum and we are really grateful for that.”

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “We’d like to say a personal thank you to all the staff who gave up their own time and for their commitment and support to keeping local NHS services up and running.”

Chief officer of Sefton CCG’s celebrates 35 years of NHS service

Chief officer of NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG has reached 35 years of service at the NHS and is marking the occasion in several ways.

Fiona Taylor, who joined the NHS in 1982 the age of 17, has recently become Trustee of St Ann’s Hospice in Manchester and has also joined the board of Advancing Quality Alliance (AQUA).

Talking about reaching this momentous occasion Fiona said: “I can’t believe it’s been 35 years, it has flown by but I have to say I’ve enjoyed every minute. I do honestly love coming to work and regularly tell my colleagues that I enjoy what I do because I am so passionate about working for the NHS. It’s not always easy and I’m the first to say that but I have loved all the experiences I have had over the years in various roles and am proud to say I have been with the NHS for 35 years.

“I am very much looking forward to working with St Ann’s Hospice, they do a fantastic job and fingers crossed I can support them in key decision making and help to make a difference. It’s also great to be working with AQuA, at the forefront of transforming safety and quality in healthcare across the North West and I am looking forward to working with them on a more formal basis alongside my chief officer role of course.”

Fiona started her career in the NHS in Salford as a registered general nurse before going on to become a midwife and health visitor. Between 1990 and 1992 Fiona worked as a paediatric liaison health visitor leading service redesign before moving from a clinical role into management.

In 1999, Fiona left Salford to become deputy director of nursing and then acting director of nursing in Mancunian Community Health Trust, later joining Bradford City Teaching Primary Care Trust (PCT) in 2001. Since then, Fiona has worked at director level and held a variety of roles and portfolios, including acting chief executive of Bradford City Teaching PCT. In 2012 Fiona was appointed chief officer of the two CCG’s in Sefton so has been in that role for five years now.

St Ann’s Hospice cares and helps thousands of patients (over the age of 16) and their families and carers every year who are affected by cancer and non-cancer life limiting illnesses. The staff deliver care that is special and unique to each individual person. Around 40% of inpatients at St Ann’s Hospice return home after treatment.

The Advancing Quality Alliance (AQuA) was established in 2010 to improve health and care quality in the North West. It has over 70 member organisations who it works with on a long term basis.

Health and housing come together to help customers

A six week course for One Vision Housing customers took place at Millspring Court in Bootle with local health commissioners and Sefton Council for Voluntary Service (CVS) to help people self-care for their breathing conditions.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and One Vision Housing organised the course for customers who have a breathing condition such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Those who joined the group benefitted from classes on breathing self-management, inhaler techniques and looking after themselves through the cold weather whilst staying independent.

Suzanne Meylan, independent living manager at One Vision Housing, said: “It is important to us that we give our customers access to information to improve their health as close to home as possible so this course was perfect for many of them as it was held in the communal room at Millsprings. Hopefully we’ll roll out similar sessions in other areas in the future. In the One Vision Housing session we spoke to the customers about our independent living service and offered advice on how to keep warm in the winter months with Sefton Council’s affordable warmth team.”

Jenny Kristiansen, respiratory programme lead at NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “We wanted to tailor each session so that customers got the most from the course. Working with Sefton CVS, Liverpool Community Health and Healthwatch Sefton, our sessions focused on topics such as advice on staying active, relaxation and breathing techniques and advice on how to cope under stress and train the mind to not let stress affect your breathing.”

The general feedback following the sessions was positive. One individual said that they felt more assertive since the course and more confident, whilst others said that the exercises had really improved their breathing when walking and they could now climb stairs a lot easier than previously. Others said that the sessions were good as they got people with similar conditions together and hopefully they will keep in touch.

The event was organised with support from Mersey Internal Audit Agency (MIAA), a specialist provider of internal audit and related services in the UK. The overarching object of this project was to demonstrate the significant benefits that can be achieved through health and housing working collaboratively.

Public welcome at local CCG meetings

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Sefton have announced the dates of their first governing body meetings for 2017 and are encouraging anyone with an interest to go along.

The CCGs’ hold their bi-monthly governing body meetings in public, so people can hear them discussing and making decisions about local health services.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals who make up the committees will discuss a range of issues including the performance of the services they commission, like hospitals and community care.

Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “The governing body is a formal meeting and it’s a way for people to find out more about what we’re doing. They can also ask us any questions ahead of the meeting getting underway.”

Andy Mimnagh, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG chair, said: “The meetings are also a chance for residents to meet some of the doctors and other professionals that make up the governing body and to listen in on the discussions taking place.”

The NHS Southport and Formby CCG meeting will take place on Wednesday 25 January at the Family Life Centre, Ash St, Southport, Merseyside, PR8 6JH, at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

The NHS South Sefton CCG meeting will take place on Thursday 26 January at Merton House, Stanley Road in Bootle at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings   

Anyone who is interested in attending is asked to call 0151 247 7000 to confirm their attendance.

NHS and the council offer advice as cold weather warning is issued

Following the Met Office cold weather alert across the North West, the local NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCG’s) and Sefton Council are reminding people to stay warm and to examine their options should they or their family become ill.

The Level 2 alert means that between 0600 on Wednesday 4 January and 1500 on Friday 06 January, there is an 80 per cent chance of severe cold weather. This weather could increase the health risks to vulnerable patients and disrupt the delivery of services.

Dr Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “We’d like to remind people about the options available to them if they or a member of their family becomes ill. The cold weather will put added pressure on health services so it’s really important to use the right service.”

Dr Andy Mimnagh, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG chair, said: “If you do become ill we ask that you think about self care before seeing your GP, visiting the walk in or dialling 999. Your chemist can offer advice and medication for minor illnesses without an appointment and NHS 111 is available for non-emergencies.

“I would also advise those who are eligible to have a flu jab to get protected. Whether you are pregnant, have very young children, are an elderly person or have a health condition, such as asthma, heart disease, diabetes or are an older person you will be eligible for the vaccination.”

Cllr Ian Moncur, cabinet member for Health and Wellbeing at Sefton Council, said: “During this cold spell we’d like to encourage residents to look out for those who may be living alone, check in with neighbours and take weather conditions into account when planning to travel. Help and advice is available from pharmacies over the festive period for minor illnesses, we would encourage people to use these services before seeing GP and A&E departments. ”

The Public Health England Cold Weather Plan  sets out a series of actions that health and social care organisations, voluntary and community groups, and individuals can take and plan for cold temperatures to help reduce cold-related illnesses and deaths.

Top tips to prepare for colder weather:

  • look out for friends and family who may be vulnerable to the cold and ensure they have access to warm food, drinks and are managing to heat their homes adequately
  • try to maintain indoor temperatures to at least 18°C, particularly if you are not mobile, have long term illness or are 65 or over
  • stay tuned for weather forecasts, ensure you are stocked with food and medications in advance (have deliveries or ask a friend to help)
  • take weather into account when planning your activity over the following days
  • avoid exposing yourself to cold or icy outdoor conditions if you are at a higher risk of cold related illness or falls
  • discuss with friends and neighbours about clearing snow and ice from in front of your house and public walkways nearby, if unable to do so yourself

Remember to examine your options should you or a family member become ill during winter, more information can be found here: www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/your-health-and-services  // www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/your-health-and-services

For more information on the weather in your area please visit: www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/cold-weather-alert/#?tab=coldWeatherAlert

Pharmacy Opening Hours over Christmas (South Sefton)

For those who need it over the festive period, visit your pharmacist for confidential, expert advice and treatment of minor health issues.

You can also pick up over the counter medicines from your pharmacist such as:

  • Paracetamol
  • Ibuprofen
  • Antihistamines
  • Eye drops
  • Anti-diarrhoea medicines such as loperamide (Imodium)
  • Soar throat medicines
  • Decongestants
  • Cough medicines

Please note that the opening times below are only for the pharmacies we know are open, do check with your local pharmacy if they are not on the list.

Sefton CCGs hailed finalists for prestigious HSJ award

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) were named a finalist at the prestigious Health Service Journal (HSJ) Award held at the InterContinental O2 in London on 23 November.

Their apprenticeship scheme with Hugh Baird College was shortlisted under the workforce category with ten other entrants across the UK.

The bespoke course designed and shaped by the CCGs with Hugh Baird College gave apprentices the chance to train whilst working in a GP practice to get the hands on experience that they need. Many of them still work in practice and some have gone on to complete further training.

Debbie Fagan, chief nurse at the CCGs said: “We were absolutely delighted to be shortlisted for the award, the team here worked so hard to design the course with Hugh Baird and all of the apprentices who took part have expressed how beneficial it was to them.

“In this climate where it isn’t that easy to source funding for further qualifications or to get jobs easily, they relished the opportunity and gave it their all. We are just happy that they found it so worthwhile. A big well done goes to all of the winners on the night, especially to London Ambulance Service NHS Trust in the workforce category.”

Alastair McLellan, Editor, HSJ, said: “With the NHS experiencing a tough time as funding fails to keep up with demand, the HSJ Awards were once again the best reminder of the excellence the service is capable of. Taken together the entries to the HSJ Awards represent work which, directly or indirectly, has saved thousands of lives and enhanced many times that number.”

Now in their 35th year, the most sought after accolade in British healthcare recognises, celebrates and promotes the finest achievements in NHS, and showcases them to the service’s most influential leaders.

To view a short video about the CCGs’ apprenticeship scheme please visit please visit: www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5HPrUU1rNk

For the full winner list please visit:

www.hsj.co.uk/newsletter/topics/quality-and-performance/hsj-awards-2016-winners-revealed/7013566.article?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter308

Sefton Young Advisors ‘takeover’ at South Sefton CCG and Southport & Formby CCG

Young Advisors from Sefton Council for Voluntary Service (CVS) took control of a high level engagement meeting at NHS South Sefton CCG and NHS Southport and Formby CCG to mark the launch of the Children’s Commissioner for England’s Takeover Challenge 2016.

Six young people from Sefton Young Advisors led a meeting of the CCGs’ joint Engagement and Patient Experience Group (EPEG) on 18 November and took over the CCGs’ twitter accounts at the same time.

Ryan McCarthy, aged 17, a Sefton Young Advisor who attended the session, said: “It was great to be given the chance to come into the CCGs and speak to people from our local NHS. It matters for us what happens to healthcare in Sefton in the future and how we are engaged with so we really welcomed the opportunity.”

The CCGs’ EPEG meetings aim to ensure that local people’s voices of all ages are heard and considered when planning local healthcare and that there are effective channels of communication and networks in place to enable this to happen.

EPEG brings the CCGs together with partners from Sefton Council, Sefton CVS, Healthwatch Sefton and Sefton Carers Centre to encourage borough residents to get involved in their local NHS, and a Young Adviser has recently joined the group.

In addition to regular EPEG members, representatives from organisations that directly provide health services, like Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust and Liverpool Community Health NHS Trust, were also invited to come along.

Ryan continued: “I hope it was useful for the CCGs for us to take over their meeting and that they got some ideas from us about how best to engage with young people across Sefton. We look forward to working more with the CCGs in the future.”

The session started off with an ice breaker to get everyone to know each other before presenting their views about how best to engage with young people like themselves. Some of their top tips to involve young people were don’t use jargon or acronyms, never assume and always ask for their opinions and always keep them informed and included.

A video was also shown by The Camhelions, a group of young people who champion youth mental health in Sefton, about the transition from children’s to adult’s mental health services. The video can be viewed here vimeo.com/159070184.

Debbie Fagan, chief nurse and lead for children’s services at the CCGs, said: “It’s so important that we engage with young people and what better way to find out what works best than from the young advisers themselves.

“We value their input and there were some great ideas from them at the meeting that we’ll certainly be taking on board. I hope it was useful for them as well to understand a bit more on how the local NHS works. We are particularly looking forward to working in partnership with the young advisors to target the hard to reach and more vulnerable children which is really important to the CCGs.”

Anne Longfield, Children’s Commissioner for England, said: “Takeover Challenge goes from strength to strength every year, with tens of thousands of children across England now taking part. I am enormously grateful to organisations and individuals who embrace the challenge and throw open their doors to involve young people.

“Young people are full of fresh ideas, imagination and energy so they can really provide a fresh perspective that organisations can benefit from. Giving children and young people a chance to do adult roles for the day helps organisations understand the needs of children, who also use the experience to show off their talents and achieve their full potential.”

Takeover Challenge is a country-wide event run by the Children’s Commissioner for England which gives children the opportunity to step in the shoes of adults at work.

The Challenge has grown year-on-year with more than 45,000 children from all over the country taking part in 2016. Organisations and individuals who get involved include major broadcasters, government departments, a West End theatre and MPs.

Hear more about your local NHS

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Sefton have announced the dates of their next governing body meetings and are encouraging anyone with an interest to go along.

The CCGs’ hold their bi-monthly governing body meetings in public, so people can hear them discussing and making decisions about local health services.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals who make up the committees will discuss a range of issues including the performance of the services they commission, like hospitals and community care.

Rob Caudwell, local GP and NHS Southport and Formby CCG chair, said: “The governing body is a formal meeting and it’s a way for people to find out more about what we’re doing. They can also ask us any questions ahead of the meeting getting underway.”

Andy Mimnagh, local GP and NHS South Sefton CCG chair, said: “The meetings are also a chance for residents to meet some of the doctors and other professionals that make up the governing body and to listen in on the discussions taking place.”

The NHS South Sefton CCG meeting will take place on Thursday 24 November at Merton House, Stanley Road in Bootle at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

The NHS Southport and Formby CCG meeting will take place on Wednesday 30 November at the Family Life Centre, Ash St, Southport, Merseyside, PR8 6JH, at 1pm. Papers will be made available here beforehand: www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/about-us/governing-body/governing-body-meetings

Anyone who is interested in attending is asked to call 0151 247 7000 to confirm their attendance.

Help yourself to stay healthy this winter

Health leaders at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are encouraging people this self-care week (14-20 November) to be aware of how they can look after themselves this winter and to examine their options should they become ill.

By keeping fit and healthy, individuals can take control of their own health, manage minor illnesses and effectively manage long term conditions.

If you do need further help, think carefully and examine your options available across Sefton. For example, think about using NHS 111 for advice as they can direct you to the appropriate service. Go to your local chemist for advice if you need it, they can offer assistance on minor ailments and common illnesses.

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “It’s important that people know when and how they can treat themselves and when they should seek further advice. By taking simple steps to look after yourself this winter, you can have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing.

“When it comes to treating minor ailments and illnesses, it’s important to examine your options. You can get plenty of advice from your local chemist as well as on the NHS Choices website. Remember, the accident and emergency departments and ambulance services are for life-threatening conditions. By selecting the right option, you can help the NHS to direct their focus to the patients who need it the most.”

The week compliments the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, encouraging people to look after themselves during the winter months – reminding them to see a pharmacist if they need advice on managing cough or cold symptoms; and for older people, a reminder to keep warm during the winter months by putting on an extra layer or turning up their heat.

More information on how everyone can use self-care to improve their health and wellbeing is available on the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk. And for more information on the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, visit: www.nhs.uk/staywell

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care. There are a variety of services that can support you to do this:

Pharmacy Services

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can help you prepare for many of the common illnesses like coughs and colds.

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies and dentists in your local area by visiting the NHS.uk website: http://www.nhs.uk. It also includes a symptom checker.

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service. NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: http://www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

Patients can also manage their health needs at home using Patient Access which is available on desktop or as a free app where you can arrange appointments, order repeat medications and update your personal details.*

For more information on Patient Access visit: https://patient.emisaccess.co.uk/account/login or watch this video for more information: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRM5YzabvVc

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

For more information please visit www.examineyouroptions.info

*please note that some practices may use a slightly different system to patient access so it is worth asking your GP practice for more information

Help yourself to stay healthy this winter

Health leaders at NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) are encouraging people this self-care week (14-20 November) to be aware of how they can look after themselves this winter and to examine their options should they become ill.

By keeping fit and healthy, individuals can take control of their own health, manage minor illnesses and effectively manage long term conditions.

If you do need further help, think carefully and examine your options available across Sefton. For example, think about using NHS 111 for advice as they can direct you to the appropriate service. Go to your local chemist for advice if you need it, they can offer assistance on minor ailments and common illnesses.

Dr Andrew Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “It’s important that people know when and how they can treat themselves and when they should seek further advice. By taking simple steps to look after yourself this winter, you can have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing.

“When it comes to treating minor ailments and illnesses, it’s important to examine your options. You can get plenty of advice from your local chemist as well as on the NHS Choices website. Remember, the accident and emergency departments and ambulance services are for life-threatening conditions. By selecting the right option, you can help the NHS to direct their focus to the patients who need it the most.”

The week compliments the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, encouraging people to look after themselves during the winter months – reminding them to see a pharmacist if they need advice on managing cough or cold symptoms; and for older people, a reminder to keep warm during the winter months by putting on an extra layer or turning up their heat.

More information on how everyone can use self-care to improve their health and wellbeing is available on the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk. And for more information on the national Stay Well This Winter campaign, visit: www.nhs.uk/staywell

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care. There are a variety of services that can support you to do this:

Pharmacy Services

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can help you prepare for many of the common illnesses like coughs and colds.

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies and dentists in your local area by visiting the NHS.uk website:  http://www.nhs.uk. It also includes a symptom checker.

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service.  NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

If you need medical care for illnesses you cannot treat yourself, then your GP should be your next port of call.

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: http://www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

Patients can also manage their health needs at home using Patient Access which is available on desktop or as a free app where you can arrange appointments, order repeat medications and update your personal details.*

For more information on Patient Access visit: https://patient.emisaccess.co.uk/account/login or watch this video for more information: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRM5YzabvVc

 

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

For more information please visit www.examineyouroptions.info

*please note that some practices may use a slightly different system to patient access so it is worth asking your GP practice for more information

CCGs chief officer completes 12 hour ambulance shift

The chief officer of two Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in Sefton took part in a 12 hour shift with the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) to get to grips with the way they work.

Fiona Taylor of NHS South Sefton CCG and NHS Southport and Formby CCG decided to take part in observing a full shift with two ambulance crew and listened in on 999 calls to get a real feel for the service and an understanding of how busy they are.

Talking about the shift, she said: “I like to go out to observe the different services that we commission and working with NWAS has been something I’ve wanted to do for a while. I know that NWAS has been under scrutiny for not meeting turnaround times but now I see why as they are so busy.

“I was surprised by the number of call outs in one day but despite this, the staff I worked with delivered compassionate patient care throughout the shift. It really was enjoyable, though hard work but the crew’s individual commitment was very humbling to see.

“I’d like to say a huge thank you to the team for letting me shadow their day, I’ve also been to the control room to gather an understanding of how the calls are dealt with as I think it’s so important that I am fully aware of all aspects of service delivery so we have a greater understanding as a CCG.”

Interim head of service at North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust, Bob McGowan comments: “Accompanying an ambulance crew is always a real eye-opener for anyone and is especially important when the observer is one of our NHS colleagues.

“The working environment for our crews is vastly different to hospital staff, and while the aim is the same, providing the best possible care for the patient, it is always worthwhile to see first-hand the challenges we face. By doing so, we can effectively work together to improve patient care and experience.”

The CCGs remind people to examine their options before calling 999, which is for life threatening cases.

Feeling Unwell? – Examine Your Options

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care. There are a variety of services that can support you to do this:

Pharmacy Services

Your local pharmacy can offer free, confidential and expert advice on a range of health issues. They can help you prepare for many of the common illnesses like coughs and colds.

NHS.UK

You can find a wealth of trusted advice about hundreds of health conditions and details of GPs, pharmacies and dentists in your local area by visiting the NHS.uk website:  http://www.nhs.uk. It also includes a symptom checker.

NHS 111

When you need medical help or advice fast, but it is not a 999 emergency, you can also call the NHS 111 service.  NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

Your Local GP

Your GP should be your first point of contact for non-emergency illnesses you can’t treat yourself. Your GP is available from 8.00am to 6.30pm weekdays.

If you don’t have a GP, you can register with your local surgery. If you’re not sure where this is, you can find out at: http://www.nhs.uk or call 0300 77 77 007.

GP Out of Hours Service

If your local surgery is closed, you can still see a GP with the GP out-of-hours service; just call 111 and you can speak to a local GP over the phone or face to face if necessary.

It is very likely that you and your family will be seen and treated more quickly using the out-of-hours service than if you were waiting to see a doctor in A&E, especially at busy times.

NHS Walk-In Centres

Walk-in centres provide treatment 365 days a year for illnesses that you can’t treat yourself and there’s no need to book an appointment.

For more information please visit www.examineyouroptions.info

Sefton’s CCGs shortlisted for prestigious Health Service Journal (HSJ) award

Apprentices celebrate graduating from the scheme at the L20 in Bootle

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have been shortlisted for a prestigious Health Service Journal (HSJ) Award.

Their apprenticeship scheme with Hugh Baird College has been shortlisted under the workforce category with ten other entrants across the UK.

The bespoke course designed and shaped by the CCGs with Hugh Baird College gave apprentices the chance to train whilst working in a GP practice to get the hands on experience that they need. Many of them still work in practice and some have gone on to complete further training.

Debbie Fagan, chief nurse at the CCGs said: “We are absolutely delighted to be shortlisted, the team here worked so hard to design the course and all of the apprentices who took part have expressed how beneficial it was to them.

“In this climate where it isn’t that easy to source funding for further qualifications or to get jobs easily, they relished the opportunity and gave it their all. We are just happy that they found it so worthwhile.”

Alastair McLellan, Editor, HSJ, said: “With the NHS experiencing a tough time as funding fails to keep up with demand, the HSJ Awards are once again the best reminder of the excellence the service is capable of. Taken together the entries to the HSJ Awards represent work which, directly or indirectly, has saved thousands of lives and enhanced many times that number.”

Now in their 35th year, the most sought after accolade in British healthcare recognises, celebrates and promotes the finest achievements in NHS, and showcases them to the service’s most influential leaders.

The next stage for the CCGs will be to complete a presentation and interview to a judging panel made up of senior and influential figures from the health sector. The winners will then be announced at the prestigious ceremony in partnership with de Poel health + care on 23 November 2016 at the InterContinental O2 in London.

For the full shortlist please visit: awards.hsj.co.uk/2016-shortlist

CCG donates wool to help people with dementia

 

 

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has recently donated wool to be made into a sensory item for dementia patients called ‘twiddlemuffs’.

The specially-knitted hand muffs have items such as buttons, ribbons or textured fabric attached to keep dementia patients who may become agitated busy with their hands. They are now being used nationally in a lot of hospitals around the UK.

Brendan Prescott, deputy chief nurse at the CCG said: “We were in a meeting with one of the local hospitals when we spotted the colourful knitted ‘twiddlemuffs’ on the tables which sparked a conversation about how the Swan Centre, a local charity in Bootle made them for people with dementia. We were able to take one back to show colleagues at the CCG and we decided to donate some wool to help them create more as they are increasingly in demand.

“Joan and Rita from the Swan Centre were really pleased to receive it and have said they will deliver them to local hospitals once they are made.”

Dementia is important to the CCG and it is working towards becoming ‘dementia friendly’ and encouraging GP practices to become “dementia friends” too. The CCG signed a pledge with Sefton Dementia Action Alliance (DAA) earlier in the year, supporting the national movement to bring about a society wide response to dementia.

Learning a little bit more about what it’s like to live with dementia and then turning that understanding into action is what dementia friends do. From telling friends about dementia friends to visiting someone you know living with dementia, every action counts.

 

Sefton CCGs: “Our repeat prescription ordering pilot explained”

Are you a patient at one of the 19 GP practices taking part in the Sefton CCG’s repeat prescription ordering pilot? If so, take a look at the film below that tells you more about how the pilot works.

You can also find answers to some frequently asked questions that people have been asking us on this dedicated webpage, along with links to more short films that you may find helpful.

There is also a short survey on the webpage that the CCG’s are asking patients from the 19 practices involved to complete with their feedback.

Pilot to improve medicines safety and reduce waste

A new pilot in 19 Sefton GP practices is beginning on 1st September, which will improve the safety of repeat prescriptions and reduce wasted medicines, estimated at costing the local NHS at least £2 million each year.

NHS Southport and Formby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS South Sefton CCG are piloting the new system that stops pharmacies from being able to order repeat prescriptions on behalf of patients from those participating practices.

Susanne Lynch, head of medicines management for both CCGs, said: “It is important to note that the pilot will not affect anyone who already orders their own repeat prescriptions directly from their GP practice, and whilst the new system may be inconvenient for some, it does address some very real medicines safety issues as well as safeguarding precious NHS funds.”   

Whilst GP practices will put special arrangements in place for those patients who are not able to order their own repeat prescriptions directly from their GP practice, the new system is expected to affect just over 47,000 of a total of nearly 280,000 people registered at practices in Sefton.

It means that from 1 September, GP practices will be able to more safely monitor repeat prescriptions for these patients, ensuring their repeat medications remain appropriate for their individual medical conditions, which often change over time.

Dr Rob Caudwell, chair of NHS Southport and Formby CCG and Southport GP, said: “We know that the current system often leads to patients receiving medications they do not require, yet because their pharmacy orders their repeats for them people continue to receive excess, which is a real safety issue and we need to end this.” 

So, as well as introducing safer prescribing systems, the scheme will also save money, enabling more vital NHS funds to be spent on priority healthcare benefiting a greater number of Sefton residents.

Councillor Catie Page, chair of Sefton Council’s Overview and Scrutiny Committee for Adult Social Care and Health, said: “We know our NHS services are operating in difficult financial times, so anything that can save resources whilst importantly improving patient safety at the same time has to be welcomed and I’d encourage residents who may experience some initial inconvenience to consider the overwhelming safety and cost benefits of this pilot.”

Bootle GP, Dr Anna Ferguson, added: “This is about patients, carers, practices and pharmacies working together to achieve the safest and most cost effective prescribing systems that benefit us all.” 

Cllr Page concluded: “If you are experiencing any difficulties don’t be afraid to speak to your practice or the Patient Advice and Liaison Service to resolve any issues.” 

The pilot will initially run for six months in the 19 participating practices and patients will be invited to give their views and experiences as part of the evaluation of the system.

Anyone wanting to give their views about the pilot can complete a short survey, which can be found on each CCG’s website, along with more information about the project by following the links below.

NHS Southport and Formby CCG website – http://www.southportandformbyccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/current-exercises/pilot-scheme-for-ordering-repeat-medicines/

NHS South Sefton CCG website – http://www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/current-exercises/pilot-scheme-for-ordering-repeat-medicines/     

Those patients affected by the scheme have been sent a letter from their practice and the two CCGs, giving them full details of how the pilot will work and what it means for them. Anyone who has queries or who wants to know more can contact the PALS team on 0800 218 2333 or email CMCSU.PALS@nhs.net 

NHS and the council offer tips to stay cool in the heatwave

Following the level two heatwave warning from the Met Office health experts and the council are offering tips on how to keep cool and are reminding parents to keep children protected from the sun ahead of the school holidays.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Sefton Council are reminding those with breathing conditions in particular to stay cool and avoid the sun at the hottest part of the day if they can.

The Met Office has issued the heatwave alert, with a 40% risk for the North West and say the highest temperatures are expected Tuesday afternoon. There is an 80% probability of heatwave conditions between 12:00 Monday and 18:00 Thursday in parts of England.

For people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the sun can cause their bodies to go into overdrive as it tries to stay cool. They can become dehydrated and overheat causing the body to perspire, making them feel more breathless than usual. It is advised that they plan their day around the heat if they can so perhaps avoid going outside during the hottest point which are normally between 11:00 and 15:00.

Also, with the school holidays approaching, parents are being reminded to make sure children have plenty of sun protection. It is important to keep them topped up with sunscreen and put hats on them in the heatwave to protect them from the hot weather.

Nigel Taylor, clinical lead at NHS South Sefton CCG said: “It is important for people to avoid the sun where they can and to drink lots of water to keep hydrated. Keeping your house cool will help with the use of fans and also keeping the curtains closed is a good idea.

“It is important to eat as normal, often the heat makes you lose your appetite but it is important to keep to your normal diet to replace the natural salt in food that you lose through perspiring. If you do become ill during the heatwave we are reminding people to examine their options, there is lots of help out there at your pharmacy and on the NHS 111 number to consider before thinking about going to A&E. Hospitals do become a lot busier when a heatwave hits so it could save you a lot of time.”

Cllr Ian Moncur, Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing at Sefton Council, said: “Like the CCG we are reminding Sefton residents to be careful during the heatwave. We are reminding people to dress wisely for the weather, lightweight, loose fitting clothes are best and wearing suitable headwear and a good pair of sunglasses will really help.

“Take cool showers if you get too hot and where possible avoid heavy activity and slow down when walking around. Before planning a day out in the holidays it would be good to check what the weather is doing as you may need to change your plans slightly or make yourself a bit more prepared.”

Across the area there are a range of health services to support people if they feel unwell or have any health concerns. There are services which you may be unfamiliar with, but could be more appropriate and convenient for you depending on your specific issue.

For minor ailments and injuries your best route to recover is likely to be self-care such as ‘care at the chemist’. More information on examining your options can be found here: www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/your-health-and-services

For more information on the weather in your area please visit: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/forecast/#?tab=map

CCG pilot success in Sefton leads to national rollout

A pilot scheme in Sefton to enhance cervical screening tests for women has now been rolled out across England.

Sefton was one of six areas involved in the pilot study which tests women for the presence of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) which has been strongly linked to the development of cervical cancer. Before now, the HPV test was only done if abnormal cells were found in the smear sample. NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG both took part in the pilot.

HPV screening makes no difference to how the screening sample is taken but women with a negative HPV test can be reassured that they are at extremely low risk of developing cervical cancer so is beneficial to Sefton residents.

Dr Debbie Harvey, a Macmillan GP from NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “We are proud to be one of the first to run with the HPV testing and we are so pleased that it’s been rolled out across England now so that each screening is tested for it automatically.

“It surprises me how many women don’t go for smear tests and our GPs and practice nurses across Sefton are always encouraging patients to attend their appointment. With the new HPV testing 600 new cases of cervical cancer could be prevented per year which is great news.”

According to a survey carried out by Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust, one in three women over 50 has delayed or not attended their cervical screening test, which should take place every five years. Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust surveyed 1,000 women over 50.

The average time women put off getting screened was more than two years but one in 10 delayed their test for more than five years.

Across the whole of the UK, women are invited for cervical screening between the ages of 25 and 64. Women aged 25-49 are invited every three years and women aged 50-64 are invited every five years. In England, all girls aged 12 to 13 are offered HPV vaccination as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme. The vaccine protects against the High Risk Human Papilloma Virus strains.
Women can make an appointment with their local GP when they receive a letter or ring the surgery to check when they are due a screening test. Alternatively, you can make an appointment at your local sexual health clinic.

They can also make an appointment to be screened at one of Sefton’s sexual health service clinics by calling 01704 513303.

For more information on cervical screening please visit: www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Cervical-screening-test/Pages/Introduction.aspx

 

Talking challenges and opportunities at Big Chat 6

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCG’s) sixth Big Chat gave people a chance to give their views on their local NHS and how to shape future services so they are more effective and efficient.

Over 70 guests took part in workshop style discussions with professionals from the CCG around the challenges faced by the health service and they were asked for their views and ideas about the opportunities that exist to address them.

The workshop style sessions focused on four areas of healthcare that attendees were invited to give feedback on. These sessions explored how the CCG might reduce the estimated yearly £2 million cost of wasted medicines in Sefton, use technology to enhance health services and make them more efficient, commission care that offers the best medical outcomes for patients and change ways of working in GP practices, so that patients can be seen by the right professional first time to help surgeries to better respond to the increasing demands on health services.

Dr Andy Mimnagh, chair of NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “This was my first Big Chat event as chair of the CCG and I was really impressed with the turn out. People were keen to give their feedback and we had some great ideas and viewpoints from our workshop discussions and shared on our ‘innovation wall’.

“These are challenging times for the NHS and it’s more important than ever that we prioritise our resources effectively to ensure that all our patients have continued access to high quality, essential health services when they need them.

“We have to find savings of just over £10 million this financial year to meet our NHS budgetary requirement to achieve a 1% surplus, so like all other public services this will mean we have some difficult decisions to make in the months ahead and the views of our local residents are vital in moving this work forward.”

At the end of the event the audience took part in an interactive voting session to find out what people thought of the event and over 80% felt that Big Chat 6 had given them the opportunity to have their views heard.

Sefton Alzheimer’s Society was also at the event speaking about dementia and the difference that small things can make to those living with the condition. This is part of the CCG’s pledge to the Sefton Dementia Action Alliance to encourage people to become ‘Dementia Friends’.

Big Chats are a chance for the CCG to talk with the public about its latest projects and plans and hear what they think. The events are one of the ways that the CCG involves local residents in its work. Feedback from these events informs the CCG’s thinking about changes or developments to services.

The next Big Chat will take place on Thursday 8 September from 1-4pm and will combine the CCG’s annual review. For more information please visit www.southseftonccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/our-chat-events

CCG shortlisted for top award

A campaign to reduce the annual £2 million cost to the NHS of wasted or unused medicines in Sefton each year has gained national recognition after being shortlisted for a top accolade at The Pharmacist Awards 2016.

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG’s head of medicines management, Susanne Lynch and her team were nominated in the community innovation category of the awards for their “only order what you need” campaign.

On her nomination, Susanne said: “I am so happy to have been shortlisted for this award and I have to say I couldn’t have got this far without the help of my team who have been out and about speaking to the residents of Sefton.

“People have taken a real interest in our campaign and a lot were shocked about how much waste we see from repeat prescriptions and people over ordering so I do think it will make them think twice before ordering next time.

“As head of medicine management it is extremely important to me that the message is passed on and I can’t stress enough how important it is to only order or accept medicines that you need as unused prescriptions cost the NHS in Sefton an estimated £2million a year.”

The team went out on a ‘winter tour’ to local supermarkets and community events to tell people about the savings that could be made if people were to ‘only order what they need’. On the tour they also advised on how people should take their medicine properly so they are as effective as possible but also how to dispose of medicines should they or someone they know have medicines at home that are no longer needed.

The Pharmacist Awards hosted by Zinc Media were held on 30 June at The Millennium Gloucester Hotel, London.

Sefton CCGs to become ‘dementia friendly’

NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Southport and Formby CCG have signed up to become ‘Dementia Friends’ and are well on their way to reaching their target after gaining some training from the top doctor who is leading this work.

Both CCGs are working towards being ‘dementia friendly’ with 100 reception staff at Sefton GP practices already having received the training. In addition, a group of staff at the CCGs’ offices received training from the National Clinical Director for Dementia at NHS England, Alistair Burns,

He said: “It was fantastic to be here and I was delighted to meet with so many people at the CCG. It was good to hear about the work they are already doing to improve dementia diagnosis rates in Sefton and the post diagnosis support that they are offering to patients.

“I was really impressed with the enthusiasm and energy in the room and thoroughly enjoyed the session which so many people attended. It is good news to hear that the CCG are amongst the few CCGs who have signed up to become dementia friendly. It is so important to raise as much awareness as we can and with their partners I’m sure the message will be spread far and wide.”

The CCGs’ have signed a pledge with Sefton Dementia Action Alliance (DAA), supporting the national movement to bring about a society wide response to dementia. The Sefton DAA is made up of organisations in the borough who aim to work together to radically improve the lives of people living with dementia and their carers. Its official launch in Sefton is in Dementia Awareness Week on Wednesday 18th May.

Part of the CCGs’ action plan in the alliance is to raise awareness about dementia in the community and to encourage member practices and providers to become dementia friends, which they have both started working on.

Fiona Taylor, chief officer at both CCGs, said: “Dementia is a priority area for both CCGs which is why the training was important to us. At the session when staff were asked if anyone in the room knew someone with dementia, of course, over half the room lifted their hands. We were asked to make a pledge and on behalf of the CCG I am keen to spread the word on dementia and whilst we’ve work to do to improve care and the diagnosis rate, I am really pleased that the CCGs are becoming dementia friendly and that we are part of the alliance, which is so important for Sefton.

“Dementia is of interest to everyone, not only on a personal level but on a professional one as well. It’s so important that people understand how someone with dementia may feel in certain situations. Thanks to Alistair for running the session for us, I’m sure we’ll all wear our badges proudly.

“Small changes to the way our society, communities, shops and businesses are run can make a huge difference to people with dementia. By improving awareness and having a greater understanding of dementia we can hopefully make a real difference to those living with dementia and their carers.”

A Dementia Friend learns a little bit more about what it’s like to live with dementia and then turns that understanding into action – anyone of any age can be a Dementia Friend. Whether you attend a face to face Dementia Friends Information Session or watch their online video, Dementia Friends is about learning more about dementia and the small ways you can help. From telling friends about Dementia Friends to visiting someone you know living with dementia, every action counts.

For more information visit: www.dementiafriends.org.uk

South Sefton CCG Scheme to Improve Support in Care Homes

A programme, launched by NHS South Sefton Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), is the first of its kind in the North West to offer care homes a comprehensive package of support to look after their residents.

The Care Home Innovation Programme (CHIP) brings together several initiatives to improve the quality of care homes such as community matron visits, standardisation of protocols, a bi-monthly quality improvement collaborative meeting and training for care home staff.

Due to its success the programme has recently been highlighted in the newly published end of life thematic review by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) as an example of good practice.

Dr Peter Chamberlain, GP and lead clinician for strategy and innovation at NHS South Sefton CCG, said: “Our population in south Sefton is getting older at a much higher rate than the national average, which is why we’ve developed CHIP. The number of residents being sent in and out of hospital has always been a cause for concern as we know it’s not good for their mental or physical health. A huge factor of our training is to allow patients to be treated in the place they live to cause as little upset as possible.

“Bringing together the different elements of care into one program differentiates us from others and we are very proud of the CHIP initiative. The community matrons and our care home staff do a fantastic job and are highly trained in dealing with many situations. The regular collaborative meetings also work well and encourage integrated working to ensure that each resident receives the best care for them.”

An important element of CHIP is the televideo system which is now in most care homes in south Sefton. The use of televideo offers care home staff with a range of NHS services through a single point of contact, 24 hours a day, providing community based alternatives to going to A&E.

Chamberlain continues: “We are always looking to improve the programme and it’s fantastic that we are starting to see the results from the use of televideo in south Sefton. The aim of this is to prevent residents having to go into hospital when they don’t need to and more importantly improving the quality of experience for patients. With the right advice and by being able to see the patient through video the skilled team can manage most situations from Airedale NHS Foundation Trust.”

Bernadette Makaza Muzavazi, home manager at Orrell Grange nursing home in Bootle, is just one of the people who have a CHIP success story. She said: “In December one of our residents suddenly became critically ill becoming increasingly agitated and distressed as his breathing started to become laboured.

She said: “As soon as this was noticed, one of the staff quickly dialled Airedale. While they were talking to them, a senior carer completed the communication form and took all the physical observations, while one of the nurses was reassuring the resident and keeping an eye on him at all times.

“The practitioner asked us to take the televideo laptop to the resident’s room so she could see the resident. While this was all taking place, a paramedic was in attendance and took over doing all the physical observations including an electrocardiogram (ECG) on the patient’s heart. The ambulance crew arrived in 20 minutes in case the resident had to proceed to the hospital.

“As the resident was becoming more settled and the paramedic requested for a GP visit on site the ambulance crew was sent back. The GP visited and prescribed antibiotics and steroids. The resident made a full recovery and was treated in the comfort of his own familiar environment surrounded by familiar faces.

“Prior to CHIP and Orrell Grange using telemedicine, this would have been a typical 999 call with all the hospital drama. Research shows that hospital environment or change of environment has detrimental effects to elderly people and especially people who suffer from Dementia.

“We all had a group hug following this CHIP success story. It was a good job well done, professionally and efficiently.

“Thank you to the CHIP team for adding in the use of televideo and to Airedale for arranging all three services within a short space of time. We had a paramedic, ambulance crew and a GP in attendance within a short space of time. Well done Orrell Grange staff too, 90% of our staff are now confident and competent with using tele video through training and practice organised by the CCG.”

Peter Chamberlain at the CCG said: “Bernadette’s story is just one of the many we receive and it highlights the televideo element of CHIP which is only one aspect of the program. It is fantastic to see it all coming together and to hear that it’s working. The team here at the CCG has worked hard to combine the different initiatives and to roll them out to all our care homes. The training through the collaborative meetings and through Edge Hill University is invaluable for staff giving them more confidence when caring for residents. We are now starting to see the results and this is only one example.”